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ARDAGH CHALICE meaning in English, значение слова

Meaning of ARDAGH CHALICE in English

large, two-handled silver cup, decorated with gold, gilt bronze, and enamel, one of the best-known examples of Irish ecclesiastical metalwork. It was discovered in 1868, together with a small bronze cup and four brooches, in a potato field in Ardagh, County Limerick, Ire. The decoration consists mainly of panels of fine gold and silver filigree applied to the otherwise plain body of the vessel. Studs set with coloured enamels are arranged at intervals amid the filigree decoration, which combines interlaced animal forms and spirals with repeating abstract patterns. The outside of the bowl is engraved with the Latin names of some of the Apostles. There are similarities between the letters of this inscription and some of the large initials in the celebrated manuscript known as the Lindisfarne Gospels, which likely dates from about AD 710720. Thus, the chalice is thought to date from the first half of the 8th century. It has so far proved impossible to attribute its manufacture to any particular workshop, but affinities do exist between the filigree decoration on the chalice and the decoration of the celebrated Tara brooch. Another well-known example of Irish ecclesiastical metalwork, the Moylough belt-reliquary is also decorated in a similar manner. It is likely that the Ardagh Chalice formed part of the treasury of some early Irish church or monastery, until it was disestablished and the cup was concealed for safekeeping. It is now housed in the National Museum of Ireland at Dublin.

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Other articles

Ardagh Hoard

Ardagh Hoard

The Ardagh Chalice, centrepiece of the hoard

The Ardagh Hoard. best known for the Ardagh Chalice, is a hoard of metalwork from the 8th and 9th centuries. Found in 1868, it is now on display in the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin. It consists of the chalice, a much plainer stemmed cup in copper-alloy, and four brooches, three elaborate pseudo-penannular ones, and one a true pennanular brooch of the thistle type; this is the latest object in the hoard, and suggests it may have been deposited around 900. [ 1 ] The chalice ranks with the Book of Kells as one of the finest known works of Insular art. indeed of Celtic art in general, and is thought to have been made in the 8th century AD. Elaborate brooches, essentially the same as those worn by important lay-people, appear to have been worn by monastic clergy to fasten vestments of the period.

The chalice seen from below

History

The hoard was found in 1868 by two boys, Jim Quinn and Paddy Flanagan, digging in a potato field on the south-western side of a rath (ring fort ) called Reerasta, beside the village of Ardagh, County Limerick. Ireland. The chalice held the other items, covered merely by a slab of stone; the pieces must have been interred in a hurry, probably temporarily, as though the owner probably intended to return for them at a later time. The brooches found with the chalice show that it was not buried until the Viking period.

The chalice

The whole hoard

The chalice is a large, two-handled silver cup, decorated with gold, gilt bronze, brass, lead pewter and enamel, which has been assembled from 354 separate pieces; this complex construction is typical of early Christian Irish metalwork. The main body of the chalice is formed from two hemispheres of sheet silver joined with a rivet hidden by a gilt-bronze band. The names of the apostles are incised in a frieze around the bowl, below a girdle bearing inset gold wirework panels of animals, birds, and geometric interlace. Techniques used include hammering, engraving, lost-wax casting. filigree applique. cloisonné and enamel. Even the underside of the chalice is decorated (photo below).

According to the art historian Lawrence Stone (writing before the discovery of the Derrynaflan Hoard ): "Here the Irish artist has shown a capacity for classical restraint by a deliberate decision to prevent the ornamentation from spreading so copiously as to blur the proportions. contrasting markedly with the lavish ornamental spread of the almost contemporary Tara Brooch and the still more elaborate systems of the later period. The bulk of the decoration consists of exquisitely drawn spiral or interlace patterns, given depth by the soldering of two layers of gold thread one on top of the other. At intervals are set cloisonné enamel bosses of blue and red, the complicated manufacture of which shows direct continuity with the Anglo-Saxon jewellers' craft of the preceding century. But apart from the extraordinary perfection of execution of this elaborate decoration, what gives to the Ardagh Chalice its outstanding position in Irish metalwork is the strictness of the relationship between the simple swelling lines of the cup and its base and the arrangement of the glittering studs, bands, and roundels that adorn its surface." [ 2 ] The standard monograph is L.S. Gógan, The Ardagh Chalice .

The chalice is similar to the only other major early Irish example to survive, the Derrynaflan Chalice. found close by in the neighbouring County Tipperary. That was found with a paten and liturgical strainer. At that time the ruling dynasty in Tipperary and most of Munster were the Eóganachta. while their allies and possible cousins the Uí Fidgenti ruled in the Limerick area (see Byrne 2001; Begley 1906). Although the early suggestion that the chalice was fabricated at Clonmacnoise and stolen from there by a Limerick Dane is widely circulated, this is unprovable. A Munster origin is just as likely if not more so given the 1980 discovery of the sister Derrynaflan Hoard. A Clonmacnoise origin is not mentioned at the National Museum of Ireland website [1] .

The chalice was featured on a £1 value definitive postage stamp issued by An Post between 1990 and 1995 as part of the series Irish Heritage and Treasures designed by Michael Craig.

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Ardagh Hoard .

Notes References
  • "NMI": Wallace, Patrick F. O'Floinn, Raghnall eds. Treasures of the National Museum of Ireland: Irish Antiquities ISBN 0-7171-2829-6
  • Stone, Lawrence. Sculpture in Britain: The Middle Ages. 1955, Penguin Books (now Yale History of Art)
Further reading
  • Begley, John, The Diocese of Limerick, Ancient and Medieval . Dublin: Browne & Nolan. 1906.
  • Bhreathnach, Edel. "The cultural and political milieu of the deposition and manufacture of the hoard discovered at Reerasta Rath, Ardagh, Co. Limerick", in Mark Redknap (ed.), Pattern and Purpose in Insular Art. Oxbow Books. 2001.
  • Byrne, Francis J.. Irish Kings and High-Kings. Four Courts Press. 2nd edition, 2001.
  • Duffy, Seán (ed.), Medieval Ireland: An Encyclopedia. Routledge. 2005.
  • Gógan, Liam S. The Ardagh Chalice. Dublin. 1932.
External links

Ardagh Chalice - bottom of chalice

digital file from intermediary roll film copy
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cai.2a11795

Related Ardagh Chalice -- bottom of chalice
  • Title: Ardagh Chalice -- bottom of chalice
  • Creator(s): Brennan, Alfred, 1853-1921. artist
  • Date Created/Published: [between 1870 and 1921]
  • Medium: 1 drawing. pen and ink.
  • Reproduction Number: ---
  • Rights Advisory: Publication may be restricted. For information see "Cabinet of American Illustration,"(http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/111_cai.html)
  • Access Advisory: Restricted access: Materials in this collection are often extremely fragile; most originals cannot be served.
  • Call Number: CAI - Brennan, no. 5 (A size) [P&P]
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
  • Notes:
    • Probably published in book or periodical on Irish art.
    • (DLC/PP-1933:0205).
    • Forms part of: Cabinet of American illustration (Library of Congress).
  • Subjects:
    • Metalwork.
    • Ireland.
  • Format:
    • Drawings.
    • Illustrations.
  • Collections:
    • Cabinet of American Illustration
  • Part of: Cabinet of American illustration (Library of Congress)
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       http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010715186/

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  • Rights Advisory. Publication may be restricted. For information see "Cabinet of American Illustration," http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/111_cai.html
  • Reproduction Number. ---
  • Call Number. CAI - Brennan, no. 5 (A size) [P&P]
  • Medium. 1 drawing. pen and ink.

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    • Call Number: CAI - Brennan, no. 5 (A size) [P&P]
    • Medium: 1 drawing. pen and ink.
    • Access Advisory: Restricted access: Materials in this collection are often extremely fragile; most originals cannot be served.

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  • Ardagh Chalice

    Ardagh Chalice

    Infobox Artifact
    name = Ardagh Chalice


    image_caption = Ardagh chalice at the
    National Museum of Ireland
    material = Silver and other metals, enamels
    created = Early Christian Period
    (700 CE - 800 CE )
    discovered = 1868 near the village of Ardagh, County Limerick. Ireland
    location = National Museum of Ireland. Dublin

    The Ardagh Chalice, which ranks with the Book of Kells as one of the finest known works of Insular art. indeed of Celtic art in general, is thought to have been made in the 8th century AD.

    The large, two-handled silver cup, decorated with gold, gilt bronze, brass, lead pewter and enamel, has been assembled from 354 separate pieces. The names of the apostles are incised in a frieze around the bowl, below a girdle bearing inset gold wirework panels of animals, birds, and geometric interlace. Techniques used include hammering, engraving, lost-wax casting. filigree applique. cloisonné and enameling .

    It was found in 1868, together with a small bronze cup and four brooches, by two boys, Jim Quinn and Paddy Flanagan, digging in a potato field on the south-western side of a "rath" (ring fort ) called Reerasta, beside the village of Ardagh. County Limerick. Ireland. It had a bronze cup within it, and four ornate brooches ( fibula e). Buried without the least protection as they were, the pieces must have been interred in a hurry, probably temporarily, as the owner probably intended to return for them at a later time.

    It currently resides in the National Museum of Ireland. The standard monograph is L.S. Gógan, "The Ardagh Chalice"

    The chalice was featured on a £1 value definitive postage stamp issued by An Post between 1990 and 1995 as part of the series "Irish Heritage and Treasures" designed by Michael Craig.

    Two Gaelic Athletic Association trophies are modeled on the Chalice: the O'Duffy Cup and the Sam Maguire Cup .

    * [http://www.limerickdioceseheritage.org/Ardagh/hyArdaghChalice.htm Ardagh Chalice ]

    * Derrynaflan Hoard
    * Postage stamps of Ireland
    * Insular art

    Wikimedia Foundation. 2010 .

    Look at other dictionaries:

    Ardagh Chalice — ▪ Irish ecclesiastical metalwork large, two handled silver cup, decorated with gold, gilt bronze, and enamel, one of the best known examples of Irish ecclesiastical metalwork. It was discovered in 1868, together with a small bronze cup and… … Universalium

    Chalice — • Occupies the first place among sacred vessels, and by a figure of speech the material cup is often used as if it were synonymous with the Precious Blood itself Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Chalice Chalice … Catholic encyclopedia

    Ardagh — may refer to several villages in Ireland:* Ardagh, County Donegal * Ardagh, County Longford * Ardagh, County Limerick, where the Ardagh Chalice was found * Ardagh, County Mayo, south of BallinaArdagh may also refer to the last names of several… … Wikipedia

    Chalice — For other uses, see Chalice (disambiguation) Derrynaflan Chalice, an 8th or 9th Century chalice, found in County Tipperary, Ireland A chalice (from Latin calix, cup, borrowed from Greek kalyx, shell, husk) is a goblet or footed cup intended to… … Wikipedia

    Chalice (cup) — A chalice (from Latin calix. cup, borrowed from Greek kalyx. shell, husk) is a goblet intended to hold drink. In general religious terms, it is intended for quaffing during a ceremony. Religious use Christian [ thumb|250px|Chalice in the vestry … Wikipedia

    Hort von Ardagh — Der Hort von Ardagh im Irischen Nationalmuseum Der Hort von Ardagh ist ein Hortfund, der 1868 in Ardagh in der irischen Grafschaft Limerick gefunden wurde. Er befindet sich heute im Irischen Nationalmuseum. Der Fund besteht aus dem sogenannten… … Deutsch Wikipedia

    Tassilo Chalice — The Tassilo Chalice is a bronze chalice, gilded with silver and gold, dating from the 8th century, which has probably always been at Kremsmünster Abbey, Austria.Dating from c. 770 790 AD, the chalice was donated by Luitpirga, wife of the Bavarian … Wikipedia

    Uí Fidgenti — Contents 1 Size and extents 2 Saint Patrick 3 Saint Senan 4 … Wikipedia

    Celts — Celt redirects here. For other uses, see Celt (disambiguation). This article is about the ancient peoples of Europe. For Celts of the present day, see Celts (modern). Diachronic distribution of Celtic peoples … Wikipedia

    Ardagh Hoard

    WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

    The Ardagh Chalice, centrepiece of the hoard

    The Ardagh Hoard. best known for the Ardagh Chalice, is a hoard of metalwork from the 8th and 9th centuries. Found in 1868, it is now on display in the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin. It consists of the chalice, a much plainer stemmed cup in copper-alloy, and four brooches, three elaborate pseudo-penannular ones, and one a true pennanular brooch of the thistle type; this is the latest object in the hoard, and suggests it may have been deposited around 900. [1] The chalice ranks with the Book of Kells as one of the finest known works of Insular art. indeed of Celtic art in general, and is thought to have been made in the 8th century AD. Elaborate brooches, essentially the same as those worn by important lay-people, appear to have been worn by monastic clergy to fasten vestments of the period.

    The chalice seen from below

    Contents History [ edit ]

    The hoard was found in 1868 by two boys, Jim Quinn and Paddy Flanagan, digging in a potato field on the south-western side of a rath (ring fort ) called Reerasta, beside the village of Ardagh, County Limerick. Ireland. The chalice held the other items, covered merely by a slab of stone; the pieces must have been interred in a hurry, probably temporarily, as though the owner probably intended to return for them at a later time. The brooches found with the chalice show that it was not buried until the Viking period.

    The chalice [ edit ]

    The whole hoard

    The chalice is a large, two-handled silver cup, decorated with gold, gilt bronze, brass, lead pewter and enamel, which has been assembled from 354 separate pieces; this complex construction is typical of early Christian Irish metalwork. The main body of the chalice is formed from two hemispheres of sheet silver joined with a rivet hidden by a gilt-bronze band. The names of the apostles are incised in a frieze around the bowl, below a girdle bearing inset gold wirework panels of animals, birds, and geometric interlace. Techniques used include hammering, engraving, lost-wax casting. filigree applique. cloisonné and enamel. Even the underside of the chalice is decorated (photo above).

    According to the art historian Lawrence Stone (writing before the discovery of the Derrynaflan Hoard ): "Here the Irish artist has shown a capacity for classical restraint by a deliberate decision to prevent the ornamentation from spreading so copiously as to blur the proportions. contrasting markedly with the lavish ornamental spread of the almost contemporary Tara Brooch and the still more elaborate systems of the later period. The bulk of the decoration consists of exquisitely drawn spiral or interlace patterns, given depth by the soldering of two layers of gold thread one on top of the other. At intervals are set cloisonné enamel bosses of blue and red, the complicated manufacture of which shows direct continuity with the Anglo-Saxon jewellers' craft of the preceding century. But apart from the extraordinary perfection of execution of this elaborate decoration, what gives to the Ardagh Chalice its outstanding position in Irish metalwork is the strictness of the relationship between the simple swelling lines of the cup and its base and the arrangement of the glittering studs, bands, and roundels that adorn its surface." [2] The standard monograph is L.S. Gógan, The Ardagh Chalice .

    The chalice is similar to the only other major early Irish example to survive, the Derrynaflan Chalice. found close by in the neighbouring County Tipperary. That was found with a paten and liturgical strainer. At that time the ruling dynasty in Tipperary and most of Munster were the Eóganachta. while their allies and possible cousins the Uí Fidgenti ruled in the Limerick area (see Byrne 2001; Begley 1906). Although the early suggestion that the chalice was fabricated at Clonmacnoise and stolen from there by a Limerick Dane is widely circulated, this is unprovable. A Munster origin is just as likely if not more so given the 1980 discovery of the sister Derrynaflan Hoard. A Clonmacnoise origin is not mentioned at the National Museum of Ireland website [1] .

    The chalice was featured on a £1 value definitive postage stamp issued by An Post between 1990 and 1995 as part of the series Irish Heritage and Treasures designed by Michael Craig.

    See also [ edit ]

    Wikimedia Commons has media related to Ardagh Hoard .

    BBC - A History of the World - Object: Metalwork - The Ardagh Chalice

    Metalwork - The Ardagh Chalice

    The Ardagh Chalice is believed to date from the 8th Century and is one of the finest examples of Celtic metalwork ever to be discovered. The craftsmanship employed in the creation of the Chalice and brooches shows an outstanding degree of technical knowledge and competence and there are more than 250 separate parts.

    Finds from the Tarbat Monastic workshops suggest that similar objects may well have been in production here during the same period.

    The original Chalice can be seen in the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin.

    Comments are closed for this object

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    About this object

    Ardagh Chalice: Silver Bowl, History, Description

    Ardagh Chalice (8th/9th Century)

    Alongside the Tara Brooch and the Moylough Belt Shrine. as well as the Derrynaflan Chalice. the Ardagh Chalice ranks as one of the top masterpieces of Celtic metalwork art from the Irish Insular style of the eighth or ninth century CE - part of the monastic Irish art of the period. About 6-7 inches in height and 9 inches in diameter, the ministerial chalice is a two-handed silver cup, embellished with gold, bronze, pewter, enamel, and brass fittings. Other semi-precious materials used include glass, amber, malachite and rock crystal. Assembled by Celtic metalworkers and metallurgical artists from over 350 separate components, it consists of three main pieces - the bowl, the stem and the base - all held in place by a copper bolt.

    METALWORK OF THE CELTS
    For facts about the craftsmanship
    in metalworking & goldsmithery for
    which the Celts were famous, see:
    Celtic Jewellery Art

    The hemispherical silver bowl is encircled with decorative panels of gold filigree, gilt bronze, enamelling and millefiori studs. The panels are decorated with zoomorphic images of animals and birds as well as geometric interlace patterns in the La Tène Celtic art style. Below the gold filigree, the names of the Apostles (except Judas) are lightly inscribed in a frieze. To make the Ardagh Chalice, forge workers and metallurgists had to master a wide range of techniques of precious metalwork. These would have included: melting down artifacts to produce scarce metals, lost-wax casting, riveting, soldering the gold filigree, handling molten glass, as well as techniques of cloisonné and champlevé enamelling.

    DESIGNS OF THE ANCIENT CELTS
    Celtic metalworking exemplifies
    numerous Celtic designs - many
    influenced by Greek and Etruscan
    artists - developed by craftsmen
    among the Ancient Celts.

    Date of Construction

    Archeological experts are unsure of the exact date of the chalice. It may be eighth or ninth century, although the method used to join the three basic parts (bowl, stem and base) is less sophisticated than that of its sister treasure, the Derrynaflan Chalice, which suggests the eighth century. According to Celtic scholars, this example of early Christian art was probably created by metalworkers at the Clonmacnoise monastery.

    The Ardagh Chalice was discovered in 1868, in a field near the village of Ardagh, County Limerick. by two boys, Paddy Flanagan and Jim Quin. Inside the chalice was a smaller bronze ministerial cup and four brooches. Its discovery helped to fuel the Celtic Arts Revival movement in Victorian England. The so-called Ardagh Hoard is currently on display at the National Museum of Ireland. Between 1990 and 1995, the chalice appeared on a postage stamp issued by An Post as part of the Irish Heritage and Treasures series, to commemorate outstanding works in the history of Irish art.

    Other outstanding examples of Christian art from Ireland during the late Middle Ages, include the famous Tully Lough Cross (8th/9th century) found in County Roscommon, and the Cross of Cong (12th century) commissioned by Turlough O'Connor.

    Other famous religious works of art produced in Ireland during medieval times include the magnificent gospel manuscripts (illustrated with Celtic designs) such as the Cathach of St. Columba (early 7th century), the Book of Durrow (c.670), the Lindisfarne Gospels (c.698-700), the Echternach Gospels (c.700), the Lichfield Gospels (c.730) and the Book of Kells (c.800).

    Chalices - Research Paper by Thenameshanna

    Chalices Essay

    Below is an essay on "Chalices" from Anti Essays, your source for research papers, essays, and term paper examples.

    Metalwork during the early christian period

    The historical tradition of Irish goldsmithing and jewellery begins far back in the Irish Bronze Age. Irish craftsmen produced a range of simple shapes in Bronze, copper and gold. On foot of the Celtic invasions from Europe, a new style of Celtic art took hold in Ireland, known as La Tene, which incidentally owed a great deal to the earlier Hallstatt Celtic culture, as well as Greek and Etruscan civilization.These Irish and Celtic metalworking traditions fused in the late Irish Iron Age to produce a number of outstanding pieces of artistic metalwork, of which only a few survive. Chief among them are the Broighter Collar, the Broighter Boat, the bronze trumpet from Loughnashade, County Armagh, the Gundestrup Cauldron and the Petrie Crown.

    Celtic craftsmanship in metals continued to develop in the early Christian art period, producing such masterpieces as the Tara Brooch, the Ardagh Chalice, the Derrynaflan Chalice, the Moylough Belt Shrine.

    The Ardagh Chalice
    The Ardagh Chalice, is a hoard of metalwork from the 8th and 9th centuries. The Ardagh Chalice is a two-handled chalice is an elaborate construction of over two hundred and fifty main components. The bowl and foot are made of beaten lathe-polished silver, the stem is cast gilt-copper alloy. It is decorated with gold filigree, granulation, multi-coloured enamels, a large rock-crystal, amber, malachite, knitted cast, stamped and openwork metal objects.

    A girdle of ten filigree panels of animal ornament and interlace encircles the bowl between the handles. Below it, on a dotted background are the names of the apostles. Animals and a design of human heads are lightly engraved on the lower border of the inscription below the handles and medallions. The medallions, one on each side, in the centre of the bowl, are cast bronze frames in the form of a cross of arcs within a circle, embellished with gold filigree scrolls, simple coiled serpents in beaded wire on.