How To Write Law Essays And Exams Ebookers - Homework for you

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How To Write Law Essays And Exams Ebookers

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ISBN: 1405822007 - How To Write Better Law Essays: Tools And Techniques For Success In Exams And Assignments - OPENISBN Project: Download Book Data

How To Write Better Law Essays: Tools And Techniques For Success In Exams And Assignments

This book gives students an excellent introduction to expectations of assessments at undergraduate level. It is written by an experienced law tutor who knows not only what a good law essay is but also has a good grasp on what it is that students both want and need to know. - Nick Taylor, Senior Lecturer at the University of Leeds The text provides a useful step by step guide, not only on how students should be doing things, but why they should be doing things. As such it is a useful tool in demystifying legal education, and in bridging the gap between staff and student expectations and perceptions. - Charlotte Smith, Lecturer at the University of Reading Do you want to improve your performance in your law assessments? Many students find the demands of undergraduate law coursework and exams daunting. To succeed, you need to write with great clarity and precision, to employ sound referencing and citation skills, to research and refer to a variety of primary and secondary sources and to be critical and analytical in your work. Furthermore, you will be expected to write with an air of legal professionalism and support your arguments with legal authority. How to Write Better Law Essayshelps you tackle legal assignments with confidence to maximise your chances of achieving high grades. This book is your step-by-step guide to planning, writing and succeeding in all forms of law assessment. Features * Covers the main types of legal assessment: --Essays --Problem questions --Exam questions --Extended essays and dissertations. * Gives practical examples of good and bad legal writing technique, highlighting good legal skills in action, and helping you to spot and avoid poor technique. * A dedicated Companion Website www.pearsoned.co.uk/foster includes practice exercises for each chapter and a You be the Marker' activity to help you hone your skills further The book will be invaluable to law students on undergraduate courses, joint law courses, professional courses such as CPE and ILEX, and those studying A-level and GSCE law. It can be referred to in conjunction with your study of (study) skills modules or independently throughout your law course. Postgraduate law students, will also find the text useful, particularly those whose first degree is not in law and who may need some assistance in preparing and writing law assessments. Steve Fosteris Principal Lecturer in Law at CoventryUniversity. By the same author Human Rights and Civil Liberties (ISBN 0-582-43833-0)

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Книжная лавка - Strong S


Oxford University Press / -
- Gives students a practical and proven method of analysing and approaching questions in law, while also imparting valuable writing skills, making this text an important reference tool in all areas of legal study
- Applicable to most substantive law courses, so the text can be used by students throughout their legal studies
- Includes many worked examples and helpful ‘tip’ boxes that help to reinforce a student’s learning and understanding of the process of writing law essays and exams
- Includes a chapter on general writing skills offering students valuable support with their general writing skills
New to this edition
- The brand new Online Resource Centre will feature a discussion of different citation styles and how to reference work, a breakdown of a case, plus the answers to many frequently asked questions about writing law essays and exams
- The increased format and revised layout ensures the text is as user-friendly and accessible as possible
How to Write Law Essays and Exams provides law students with a practical and proven method of analysing and answering essay and exam questions. The book focuses on those questions that give students the most trouble, namely problem questions, but its techniques are equally applicable to other types of essays. Designed for law students of all levels, including those on A-level, university, conversion, and vocational courses, the text helps students understand their substantive courses while at the same time teaching vital writing and analytical skills.
In addition to providing a framework for analysing and writing law essays, the book teaches students how to identify relevant legal authorities, distinguish and harmonise conflicting legal precedents and evaluate the applicability of the law to the facts of the question at hand. The book also contains specific law-related revision techniques and general writing tips.
Numerous worked examples help students avoid common errors, while a dedicated chapter on professional practice helps ease the transition to pupillage and traineeships. The tried and tested techniques contained in this book have increased numerous students’ understanding and enjoyment of their law courses, while simultaneously improving their marks.
Online Resource Centre
Student resources: discussion of different citation styles and referencing; a breakdown of a case; answers to frequently asked questions

How to Write New York Bar Exam Essays: 12 Steps

How to Write New York Bar Exam Essays

Every study aid says practice, practice, practice. It does not matter if you don't know the law yet. You are training for a sensory experience as well as exercising your memory. Hone your ability to tackle the sensory, the feel, the race of writing the essay. Of course you will memorize rule after rule, one at a time, until you have a pantheon of stored info. But initially, pay no mind to the rules. Start early writing timed essays. You have 5 essays total, and about 40 minutes each to do them, plus or minus a few. You'll write your essays on the first day of the exam. 3 essays in the morning, 2 more in the afternoon. This day also includes 50 NY state multi-choice and 1 Multistate Performance Test (MPT).

Below, I'm going to give you my take on the 10 points Shah and Gill offer in their helpful book, "What Not to Write: The New York Bar Exam." (See Citation below). Here's their overall message: Be clear with your issue and rule. Write relevantly. Think of this as a short form essay, be succinct. Plug the facts into the skeleton of the rule: "Here, Roopa did this, which satisfied X element. " BE CLEAR, CONCISE, RELEVANT. K, here's the 10 step break down.

Read it. Don't do anything else. Just read it.

Dig into the main issue, rule, analysis early, clearly, succinctly. I know, it's hard not to bullshit when you feel like you don't know what you're talking about. Write like you're aiming an arrow. Sharp, to the point. The rules will come. You know enough to write clearly.

Do not ever restate the facts, facts should never hang out alone in your essay. Tether your facts to your rule, that is, strain your facts through the cloth of your rule. Tie your facts to your conclusion. Embedding your facts within the branches your rule will give you analysis. And you need analysis, it is the most important and enigmatic part of your essay writing.

Know that rule cold, lay it out clearly. List out the elements. Short and sweet, enough to let the examiners know you know the rule. Site the source of law if it makes sense to do so (as in with the "New York EPTL on wills, trusts, probate. "). If an exception to the rule is relevant, write it. Be careful here with exceptions and nuances, only do it if you can do it right. If you are going to do this, you must either you know the relevant nuance/exception, or be prepared to state ALL of the exceptions/nuances. Don't get sloppy and throw in a partial list of exceptions/nuances in an attempt to cover the right one, this will call attention to your desperation. But you are never desperate during this exam, you are positive and confident.

A key point on confidence: If you DON'T KNOW the rule, DON'T SWEAT IT. Write out what sounds like a good rule (read: general, ie. "when D hit P, he committed a tort." Now use the facts, wring them out for every last bit of juice. You're simply not going to know every rule, so in this scenario, remember, you are responsible for staying confident as a writer and trying to stay OFF the examiners radar.

This is not the time to get creative, do not extend the hypo into new terrain or invent facts just for the sake of considering. Your time is expressly limited, a cage in which you do only what you must, as it is, there is barely enough time for just that. Shah and Gill say, "Avoid sentences that start with 'However, if this had happened. ' or 'If the facts had been different. "

Know the snazzy NY nuances, especially statute of limitations (SOL) and New York's No-Fault law. This will pile on the points. Hint: If the examiners ask, "is this action timely," that's your cue to talk about SOL only. Steps might look like this: 1. Identify the tort claim. 2. Say what the SOL is for that claim. 3. State when the action tolls (a highly tested issue, discuss well). 4. Write out any relevant exceptions.

Do Not's: Don't repeat yourself, don't blabber on and on about nothing, avoid even mildly fancy words, don't use casual language, "examiners will probably give a higher score to a well-articulated essay than to an essay that is not articulated well even though it covers the same issues."

Your Plan of Action: Answer the call of the question, discuss and analyze the relevant issues, and present this as a tight, concise body. You have 3-4 minutes to read the fact pattern with care, if you're not careful here you might miss an obvious point at the outset, causing a fault trickle down through the rest of your answer. Spend 6-8 minutes organizing and outlining your answer. That leaves 31-33 minutes to write out the answer. This is where practice is a must. Actually writing out essays will reveal to you your places of self sabotage, do you hesitate before writing the answer? You deserve to know that and address this pitfall of fear before the exam. Go in armed to the teeth, know all you can about how YOU fight the exam, and win.

So, what's analysis again? Good question. If you are a writer like myself, then you may already know that it is challenging to abandon yourself into the formula called "analysis" on the bar exam. Enigmatic to many, this section is also the most important part of your essay. Once you write out your issue (which itself is molded to the facts), and you state your rule, your analysis is what follows. Your analysis is where you take the literal sentences of the rule, and plug in the facts. Hint: Imagine a ladder. Your conclusion is the top of the ladder. In your analysis, you are either climbing up to your conclusion or climbing down from it. The parallel lengths of the ladder are your rule and your facts. The rungs are your analysis, which uses facts grafted into the rule to climb to a conclusion. It's helpful to use words and phrases like, "Here. "; "Without X, there would not have been Y,"; "However,"; "Because,"; "Since,"; "In this case," as in, ""In this case, the action is timely, since/because of Y facts. ";

Wildy - Sons Ltd - The World - s Legal Bookshop Search Results for isbn: 9780199684557

How to Write Law Essays and Exams provides law students with a practical and proven method of analysing and answering essay and exam questions. The book focuses on those questions that give students the most trouble, namely problem questions, but its techniques are equally applicable to other types of essays. In addition to providing a framework for analysing and writing law essays, the book teaches students how to identify relevant legal authorities, distinguish and harmonise conflicting legal precedents and evaluate the applicability of the law to the facts of the question at hand. The book also contains specific law-related revision techniques and general writing tips.

Designed for law students of all levels, including those on A-level, university, conversion, and vocational courses, the text helps students understand their substantive courses while at the same time teaching vital writing and analytical skills.

Subjects: Drafting and Legal Writing. Legal Skills and Method Contents: 1. An introduction to writing law essays and exams 2. Building the necessary foundation: reading, understanding and summarising legal materials 3. Step one in the CLEO method: the claim 4. Step two in the CLEO method: the law 5. Step three in the CLEO method: the evaluation 6. Step four in the CLEO method: the outcome 7. Adapting CLEO to 'discuss' questions 8. General tips on legal writing 9. Adapting CLEO for professional practice 10. Worked questions

How to write law essays - exams by Strong, Stacie, author

How to write law essays & exams

Solicitor, Supreme Court of England and Wales and Attorney, New York and Illinois

Description

How to Write Law Essays and Exams provides law students with a practical and proven method of analysing and answering essay and exam questions. The book focuses on those questions that give students the most trouble, namely problem questions, but its techniques are equally applicable to other types of essays.

In addition to providing a framework for analysing and writing law essays, the book teaches students how to identify relevant legal authorities, distinguish and harmonise conflicting legal precedents and evaluate the applicability of the law to the facts of the question at hand. The book also contains specific law-related revision techniques and general writing tips.

Designed for law students of all levels, including those on A-level, university, conversion, and vocational courses, the text helps students understand their substantive courses while at the same time teaching vital writing and analytical skills.

Reviews

Easy to dip into, detailed yet concise, cleverly laid out with excellent tips and pointers throughout. This textbook is sure to help any budding law student worrying about forthcoming exams or looming essay deadlines.
Angharad May, Law Student, Cardiff University ||Review from previous edition The author has a strong vision of what works in legal writing, and has broken it down for others to follow. For many students, this can be more powerful than a more eclectic approach.
Professor Peter W Edge, School of Law, Oxford Brookes University ||Strong built this book with a very accurate structure. CLEO is a method which captures the essential elements of rendering legal analysis, it is logical and comprehensive. Going through this method step by step helps students understand the intricacies of writing a good exam.
Catalina Goanta, PhD candidate and teaching assistant, Maastricht University

How to Write a Law School Essay

How to Write a Law School Essay

Law-school essay examinations can be frustrating and overwhelming. A technique known as IRAC (issue, rule, application and conclusion) is useful for writing the standard law-school essay. Follow this general guideline and the steps below to write your law-school essay exams.

  • Read through the entire essay exam question several times carefully. Pay close attention to the question asked.
  • Spot the issues relevant to the question and organize them into a logical order on scrap paper.
  • Describe the most important issue in detail as the first sentence of your essay.
  • Explain the legal rule that applies to this issue, giving a clear and concise description of the law. Note the leading cases, how the courts apply the law, limitations of the rule and policy considerations that support the law.
  • Apply the rule of law to the particular facts presented in the essay question. Explain your thought process and demonstrate to the professor that you understand how the rule is used in this context. Sometimes it is necessary to show why a rule does not apply.
  • Conclude the essay with a short statement that summarizes your position and answers the question.
  • Repeat steps 3 through 6 for every issue you noted on your scrap-paper outline.
  • Budget your time carefully. Often the biggest obstacle in taking a law-school essay exam is the clock.
Tips & Warnings
  • Law school essays are often full of superfluous information. Sift through the unnecessary facts and focus on those that relate to the question presented.
  • A short outline on scrap paper that details the issues and facts relevant to each topic is a good way to organize your thoughts. Number the issues in order of importance so if you run out of time, you have covered the most significant topics first.
  • Applying the law to the facts of the specific case is the most important section of the essay.
  • Analogies are good ways to demonstrate your understanding of a rule of law.

How to Write Better Law Essays by Steven Vaughan on Prezi

How to Write Better Law Essays

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Transcript of How to Write Better Law Essays

How to Write Better
Law Essays
Steven Vaughan
Law School, Birmingham University
May 2012
The Question

“The company’s constitution forms a contract between a company and its members. The contract is, however, an unusual one, limited in both its scope and permanence despite the best efforts of the Companies Act 2006 to clarify matters” Discuss.
This prezi is designed to give you some top tips to help you improve your skills when it comes to writing essays in the study of law.
To answer an essay question, you need to know what it
is asking of you. We call this process "interrogation". And
it's not difficult.
So, you open your exam paper and you see the essay question for the first time.
Do you:
(a) starting writing straight away and regurgitate onto the page everything you know about the topic?
(b) SCREAM? or
(c) begin interrogation?
Clue: It's not (a) or (b)
Interrogation
To "interrogate" the question
Underline the key words/concepts in the question
Separate out the various issues/topics
And then make sure to cover each off in
your answer
Let's interrogate a Company Law
essay question together as practice
Here's the question. Read it and
ask yourself what the key words,
themes, concepts are. Ask yourself:
What do I need to cover off to answer
this question perfectly? It doesn't matter
if you have or haven't studied Company Law.
Ok. What would you have to write about to
answer this essay? Let's pull out the key
words, themes and concepts.

“The
company’s constitution
forms a
contract between a company and its members
. The contract is, however, an
unusual
one,
limited in both its scope
and
permanence
despite the best efforts of the
Companies Act 2006 to clarify matters
” Discuss.
This essay's about the "company's constitution". So I would need to talk about what the company's constitution is.
I'd also need to
talk about the contract
formed between the co
and its members by the
constitution
And in particular, I'd have to talk
about how this contract was unusual.
Specifically, I need to
comment on the scope
and permanence of this
contract
Finally, I'd need
to comment on
what the Companies
Act did or didn't do
to clarify this bit of law.
So, having "interrogated" this question my essay
plan looks as follows
“The company’s constitution forms a contract between a company and its members. The contract is, however, an unusual one, limited in both its scope and permanence despite the best efforts of the Companies Act 2006 to clarify matters”, Discuss.
ESSAY PLAN
- Introduction
- What is the "company's constitution"?
- How the constitution forms a contract
- How this contract is unusual
- How the contract is limited in scope
- How the contract is limited in permanence
- What the Companies Act did re: clarification
- Conclusion
The Introduction
You've interrogated the question and that has
led you to your essay plan. Now you can pick
up your pen and start writing. You begin with
an introduction to your essay.
Think of any great book that you have read or any great film that you have watched. The first few paragraphs or scenes are designed to grab you, to make you want more. There’s fundamentally nothing different with an introduction to a law essay (save that, if you write a bad introduction, your tutors have no choice over whether or not they carry on reading. )
5 top tips for Introductions
to Law Essays
No 1
Think of context and opening lines. Essay questions in law tend to be on one big topic, from which you are asked to discuss/analyse/critically evaluate/review (etc) one small part. While your answer will have to focus on the sub-topic, you can grab the reader’s attention by giving context to the wider topic, by showing why what you are talking about is interesting or important or significant.
No 2
Have a clear line of argument. The reader needs to know, in broad terms, what you are going to say to know whether it is worth reading on. Telling them what you will be arguing also helps them understand whether you are saying something persuasive and, at a more basic level, helps them understand what it is you are trying to say. As a colleague once said, writing a law essay is not like writing a detective novel. No one wants to wait until the last line for the big reveal, to find out “whodunit”. Instead, you need to be telling your reader, in your introduction, exactly what your conclusion is going to be.
No 3
Say what you’re saying. Give the reader an idea of how your answer will be structured. This will let them know (a) whether they want to read on and (b) what sort of grasp you have of the question. A good structure is a sign of the author’s command of the material: they show they are on top of the subject and will be taking the reader through the material in a logical order. It also makes the essay easier to understand. The reader knows what to expect when.
No 4
Engage with the question. I realise that most of the time, most of you will not care about various questions in law. You will not have sleepless nights thinking about the scope and nature of legitimate expectations or the teleological approach of the ECJ. But when it comes to writing an essay question, you have to pretend to care a little bit. You have to put aside your boredom of Criminal Law/Trusts/Land Law/[insert name here of module you do not like] and show the examiner that you are engaged with the issue. One of the ways you can do is that by having an opinion/argument. So, if the question says to you, “Recklessness in Criminal Law should always be judged by an objective standard”, have an opinion (one way or the other) on that standard. It doesn’t matter if you don’t 110% passionately and whole heartedly feel/care about that opinion, just have one. Essays are arguments, not descriptions. So, the thing to take away from this tip is: have a point and get it across in the introduction.
No 5
Remember: this is law, not theatre studies. Your introduction needs to be clear, concise, well structured and to have a point/an opinion. It shouldn’t be overly flamboyant or written like the start of an opinion piece in a tabloid newspaper. So, in response to the question, “The Contract (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999 has had a limited effect on the doctrine of privity of contract”, don’t write “The 1999 Act is a travesty and a disgrace and should be abolished forthwith”. You have to strike a balance between grabbing the attention of the reader, while still writing ‘like a lawyer’.
Having done the Introduction, you now move on to writing the main body of your essay. And, obviously, you need to cover off each of the elements identified through the interrogation of the question.
Here are some tips for when
it comes to writing the main body
Timing
You might have an hour to write your essay.
You might have 45 minutes.
Whatever the time period, make sure you keep
an eye on the clock. If you have 5 elements, 5
bits to the body of your essay (and you think
each is equally important), allocate the same
number of minutes to each bit.
Running out of time is NEVER an excuse.
Authority
This is very important, so I will say it again.
Authority!
You are studying law. You are writing a law essay. So please include some law. Please include authority (statute law, case law,
academic commentary, policy documents etc) whenever you give
a proposition of law or an argument not of your own creation.
Some examples
“Mellish J stated that the articles of association are simply a contract between the shareholders in respect of their rights as shareholders”
WHERE
did he say this?
[Pritchard’s Case]
“The corporate constitution has been referred to as a relational contract”
By you? Your mum? Mayson?
As a quick guide, try and have
authority for every sentence
where you say something about the law.
"X is the standard of care expected of
learner drivers (CASE)". "YYY argues that
promissory estoppel should be abolished".
etc etc
Cases
Students always ask "Do I need to know the full name of every case?" and "How many cases should I know per topic?"
The answers are:
(a) If you can, remember the full name (i.e. "Steven v Vaughan"), but don't burst into tears if all you can remember is "Vaughan". Your examiners are semi intelligent and will probably be able to guess "Vaughan" is "Steven v Vaughan"
and;
(b) Know as many cases
as possible. From your lectures,
seminars/tutorials and reading, it
will be obvious what cases are KEY
and what cases are interesting to know
if you have the memory to recall them
Underline Case Names.
You won't get any marks for doing this. But it
does make your answer a bit neater. Similarly, use
HEADINGS where you can (for example, for different
sections of the main body)
What is it that you need to know from the case law you have studied?
That is, what do you need to evidence in your law essays?
For example, do you think anyone
wants to read "In this case in 1822
this happened and then this happened
and then this happened and then this
and then this and then this. "?
No!
For each case, know the KEY facts (ie the basics),
know the ratio and some of the more interesting
dicta. Where there are multiple judgments given,
it would be useful if you knew how the different
judges differed in their judgments.
Where the case has been overruled or distinguished,
know this too. If the case is "bad law", then know
why it is "bad law". Are there any academic commentaries
on the case that have come up from your reading?
Ok, enough about cases.
Onto how you should use
academics.
I see this all the time:
“a lot of academic debate”
“some academics”
“many academics”
“Some say that. ”
Who are these mysterious people?
And, what have they done to merit
you protecting their identities? Are they
in witness protection schemes perhaps?
When it comes to using academic commentaries
or critiques, please try
(a) to remember the name of the academic ("Vaughan argues. ")
(b) to give them the correct sex ("Vaughan argues X. She says. ")
When you read an article by
an academic, try and distill it into
a small number of key propositions,
comments or arguments.
Let's be realistic. If you have 10 articles
to read for Topic X, how many points will you
be able to get down in 45 minutes?
Know what the academic
argues. And also try and form
your own view. Can you see any
flaws in their logic? Have they
missed something? Or has the law
changed since their article?
How to do well
If you just describe the law, if you just regurgitate what you have been told in lectures and what you took from your tutorials, you will be unlikely to get more than a low 2:1 (60%). You might only get a 2:2 (50-59%).
To do well, you have to show that you can (a) evaluate the law
and (b) be critical of it. What does this mean?
In short, it means "asking questions". It means
doing more than simply "describing".
Evaluation
Criticism
To evaluate the law, you might want to start by
exploring the similarities and differences between the cases you have read and/or between different theories and/or between the views of different academics.
For each 'thing' you are considering (case, statute, academic article, policy paper etc) what are its strengths and weaknesses? You might want to assess the worth of the 'thing' in terms of the evidence on which it is based and/or how it relates to other pertinent ideas.
For more on "critical thinking", you might want
to have a look-see at this overview by Plymouth University:
http://www.learningdevelopment.plymouth.ac.uk/LDstudyguides/pdf/8Criticalthinking.pdf
The "critical" bit of
"critical evaluation" will
take time. Once you have
"evaluated" what you're looking
at, you can start to be critical
of it. You can argue that it
doesn't make sense: that a case
was badly decided for reason X or
that an academic commentary has failed
to take account of Y.
What you are aiming for is to show the reader that (a)
you understand the ins and outs of X (the case, the article, the policy paper etc), (b) you can evaluate the worth of that case/article etc and (c) that you can be critical of the thing under study. This critical bit might see you arguing one particular viewpoint or putting forward one particular theory as the one that should be predominant.
To see critical analysis in practice, simply read any
article from a decent law journal
(MLR, JLS, LQR, CLJ etc etc).
You should be aiming to replicate the framework that
the best academics use in their article writing. You should
be trying to match the ways in which they describe,
evaluate and critique the law.
To Recap:
Finally, make sure you ANSWER the question. Give a conclusion to your law essay. Don't just write down everything you know on Topic X and forget to actually answer the question that has been set for you.
This is what your law essay should contain:
An Introduction
- Which contextualises, signposts and summarises

A Body
- Which covers off all the elements in the question
- Which is brimming over with authority
- Which is logical, well ordered and signposted
- Which is more than descriptive

A Conclusion
- Which answers the question set
Practical Ways To Improve
1. Find a friend
2. Get Writing
CASSIUS:
Therefore, good Brutus, be prepared to hear,
And since you know you cannot see yourself
So well as by reflection, I your glass
Will modestly discover to yourself
That of yourself which you yet know not of.
Julius Caesar, Act I, Scene II
Shakespeare was right. We "know" ourselves best by reflection.
So find a friend and revise with them. Talk together about
what you are learning, get them to test you on your knowledge
and "brainstorm" ideas together. Get them to read your practice essays and give you feedback on them. This leads me neatly onto.
Your exams will normally be closed book, unseen questions in a set amount of time. So get used to this. Do practice answers using past papers - with no notes and in the same amount of time you would have in the exam. Do the practice answer and then
walk away from it. Go for a tea/coffee, get some fresh air, call
a friend and talk about The Voice.
Then come back to your answer and be critical of what you have done. Look at your notes and see what you missed. Check you
"interrogated" the question properly. Ask a friend to read it and see what they think. Do the same for them.
The best revision is ACTIVE.
That is, it's more than "Here are my notes.
I will read them. And reread them. And rereread them.
And that's it". By doing practice answers, you will
improve your writing skills (if, that is, you can be
reflective enough to see where you went wrong/where
you can improved)
Finally, Good Luck!

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How to Write Law Essays - Exams - Law Trove

How to Write Law Essays & Exams (4th edn) S I Strong Abstract

How to Write Law Essays and Exams provides a practical and proven method of analysing and answering essay and exam questions. The book focuses on those questions that give students the most trouble, namely problem questions, but its techniques are equally applicable to other types of essays. In addition to providing a framework for analysing and writing law essays, the book teaches how to identify relevant legal authorities, distinguish and harmonise conflicting legal precedents and evaluate the applicability of the law to the facts of the question at hand. The book also contains specific law-related revision techniques and general writing tips.

Bibliographic Information

Publisher: Oxford University Press Print Publication Date: Aug 2014 Print ISBN-13: 9780199684557 Published online: Sep 2014 DOI: 10.1093/he/9780199684557.001.0001

© S I Strong 2014

Author

S I Strong,author
Solicitor, Supreme Court of England and Wales and Attorney, New York and Illinois

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date: 25 July 2016

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