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My Cultural Identity English 2 Essay

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Cultural Identity Essay Research Paper

Cultural Identity Essay, Research Paper

‘Cultural identity’, according to Stuart Hall can be viewed through two different ways. The first position views ‘cultural identity’ in terms of one shared culture, reflecting typical historical experiences and shared cultural codes. Further, these cultural codes and common historical experiences ‘provide us, as ‘one people’, with stable, unchanging and continuous frames of reference and meaning’(Hall, p.393). The second view relies heavily on the individual’s experience of their culture. Through this view, culture is always changing, it is not static as claimed by the first definition. ‘Far from being eternally fixed in some essentialised past, they are subject to the continuous ‘play’ of history, culture and power’ (Hall, p.394). We all write and speak from a particular place and time, from a history and a culture that is specific to us, in other words from a ‘position of enunciation’. The ‘black experience’ which Hall refers to as a commonly shared history and ideology, pendant on colour, is in reality something which relies heavily on individual experience, and each experience in this case is context positioned. For example, the black experience of a Jamaican and an African living in Britain will be different even though they are both black. Hall talks about the synthesis of cultures, of having an original culture that is dominated by a colonising culture and the result being an integration of the two into something completely new. This ‘mixture’ or ‘hybridity’ is the essence of what makes Jamaica what it is today. People can’t return to the mystical origins of an idealised time in history and ignore the influences of the colonial invasion.

His conclusion is that the purpose of the modern black cinema is to allow us to recognise and explore the different parts that go into constructing our ‘cultural identities’. ‘This is the vocation of modern black cinemas: by allowing us to see and recognise the different parts and histories of ourselves, to construct those points of identification, those positionalities we call in retrospect our ‘cultural identities”(Hall, p.402). Culture is socially transmitted and if not passed on, will be forgotten, and hence will cease to exist. Through the media, culture is constructed and by analysing these cultural identities we attempt to explain ourselves and our past, therefore continuing our existence. ‘A national culture is the whole body of efforts made by a people in the sphere of thought to describe, justify and praise the action through which that people has created itself and keeps itself in existence’ (Fanon, p.188). During the British occupation of Malta, the Maltese adopted many of the British customs but modified them to fit their own cultural norms, therefore creating a hybridity of the two. For example, the language use of the upper – class in Malta. It is English, but it has been altered enough, through the accent, to make it distinct and recognisable as a Maltese dialect of the English language. This shows the synthesis of the two cultures, combining to create a new form specific to the Maltese culture after British rule.

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Cultural Identity

Cultural Identity

‘Cultural identity’, according to Stuart Hall can be viewed through two different ways. The first position views ‘cultural identity’ in terms of one shared culture. reflecting typical historical experiences and shared cultural codes. Further, these cultural codes and common historical experiences ‘provide us, as ‘one people’, with stable, unchanging and continuous frames of reference and meaning’(Hall, p.393). The second view relies heavily on the individual’s experience of their culture. Through this view, culture is always changing, it is not static as claimed by the first definition. ‘Far from being eternally fixed in some essentialised past. they are subject to the continuous ‘play’ of history. culture and power’ (Hall, p.394). We all write and speak from a particular place and time. from a history and a culture that is specific to us, in other words from a ‘position of enunciation’. The ‘black experience’ which Hall refers to as a commonly shared history and ideology. pendant on colour. is in reality something which relies heavily on individual experience, and each experience in this case is context positioned. For example. the black experience of a Jamaican and an African living in Britain will be different even though they are both black. Hall talks about the synthesis of cultures. of having an original culture that is dominated by a colonising culture and the result being an integration of the two into something completely new. This ‘mixture’ or ‘hybridity’ is the essence of what makes Jamaica what it is today. People can’t return to the mystical origins of an idealised time in history and ignore the influences of the colonial invasion.

His conclusion is that the purpose of the modern black cinema is to allow us to recognise and explore the different parts that go into constructing our ‘cultural identities’. ‘This is the vocation of modern black cinemas: by allowing us to see and recognise the different parts and histories of ourselves, to construct those points of identification, those positionalities we call in retrospect our ‘cultural identities”(Hall, p.402). Culture is socially transmitted and if not passed on, will be forgotten. and hence will cease to exist. Through the media. culture is constructed and by analysing these cultural identities we attempt to explain ourselves and our past, therefore continuing our existence. ‘A national culture is the whole body of efforts made by a people in the sphere of thought to describe, justify and praise the action through which that people has created itself and keeps itself in existence’ (Fanon, p.188). During the British occupation of Malta. the Maltese adopted many of the British customs but modified them to fit their own cultural norms. therefore creating a hybridity of the two. For example, the language use of the upper – class in Malta. It is English. but it has been altered enough, through the accent, to make it distinct and recognisable as a Maltese dialect of the English language. This shows the synthesis of the two cultures, combining to create a new form specific to the Maltese culture after British rule.

Cultural Identity

Cultural Identity

By Radhika D. Westford, MA

Disproving oneself is a part of the life experience. Self-discovery and an answer to the question "Where do I belong in life?" are things we seek until the day we die. Until recently, my search for self-discovery was composed of an effort to find out where I belonged in life. I also sought an answer to the question: "To what culture do I belong?" At first I was not able to answer this question. Following a discussion in English class that concerned cultural assimilation in America I asked myself whether America, as it is claimed, does truly promote individualism.

My bi-cultural experience began when my family immigrated to the United States from India. Nine years later I shared my struggle of being caught between two cultures with my eleventh-grade English class. We had been discussing an essay, "Does America Still Exist?" by Richard Rodriguez who believes that cultural assimilation exists in the United States. It saddens me that this process occurs without any celebration, as Rodriguez points out. Not celebrating assimilation creates the impression that America is allowing immigration solely because the economy needs it. While economic factors are the driving force behind any society, it must be acknowledged and celebrated that cultural diversity augments economic growth.

What bothers me is that Rodriguez seems to be overemphasizing the effects of cultural background in defining individuality. And because I live in America I feel as if I am being defined solely in cultural contexts. With this in mind, I began to wonder whether America is truly a place where individuality is valued. If cultural diversity is accepted, why are Americans still defined in relation to one another? Why are people being defined as diverse. different. from one another? This did not seem very individualistic to me. Surely, I concluded, if "Americans" are placed under a banner "People of Cultural Diversity," it is not very individualistic. Since it is widely accepted that America is a place where individualism is encouraged, I could not understand why "American" was defined as anything at all, much less as people who were different from one another. I mulled this over for some time and came to the temporary conclusion that America does not foster individuality.

Then I had a seemingly sudden change of heart. It was more like a revelation, really. I was selecting pictures from India to show my English class that gave examples of different aspects of Maharastrian Indian culture, such as marriage. I asked my mother to explain the pictures and how they exemplified Maharastrian customs. I was shocked how much I really had not known about my native culture and thrilled that I had immediate connections to learn more. For the first time in nine years I was able to see my cultural duality as a blessing, not a burden. I realized that if I was not in America I would not be able to share my heritage. I am able to pick and choose from different aspects of both cultures. Because of this, my individuality is more clearly defined. Hence, to me, America is a place where I can be an individual.

To what culture do I belong? I am not one hundred percent American and I am not one hundred percent Indian, so I cannot say I belong completely to one culture or the other. I can't say that I'm half and half because I don't know whether I am or not. Such a thing is impossible to quantify. I do not belong to any culture. I am of Indian heritage but I am much more than Indian. I am much more than a nationality. I am an individual who is willing to learn about all cultures and to incorporate from them the aspects that I wish. I am not American. I am not Indian. I am neither, yet both. I am an individual. I am me.


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Example Essays: Cultural Identity

1. Expository Essay on Cultural Identity

Cultural identity has a significant function in every individual's lives. I will also include my own experiences of cultural identity. My family's cultural identity plays a huge role in shaping who I am today. Embracing all cultural beliefs and identities creates tolerance and harmony. In America, many people are leading successful lives as a result of maintaining their cultural beliefs and identities.

2. The Cultural Identity of Jalila Arthur

The following paper is a critical case study that investigates the concept of identity in regards to Jalila Arthur. It is a discourse on her social structures, her practice of agency when it comes to her communication practices, and her performance of her cultural identity. Many different cultural contexts are the garden from which my identity grows, and although I would not consider myself a "cultural broker" or a "third culture kid," the ways in which I perform my culture leads to the creation of an enriched cultural blossoming of my identity (p.207-209, Martin, Judith N. & Thomas K.

3. Cultural Identity in Tim Winton

The construction of cultural identity is apparent in a writer"s shaping of place, time and characters. Discuss with reference to Cloudstreet.In the novel Cloudstreet, the author, Tim Winton has used his shaping of characters, place and time to help in the construction of the cultural identity present in the text. Thus by modifying tradition cultural identity associated with the 1950"s aE" 60"s time period, Winton has constructed his own individual version of Australian cultural identity through a 1990"s influenced point of view of the importance placed on work, rituals, class, gender, lang.

4. Adoption and Ethnic Identity

Although many transracial adoptees (being adopted into a family of a different race) are raised in a loving and caring family, the reality of where they find their cultural identity still exists. Some things to take into consideration when trying to understand how and where adoptees find their cultural identity are the age when the person was adopted, the cultural background of the adopted family, how much time the adoptee spent in their country of origin and their knowledge of where they are from (Reinoso, Juffer & Tieman, 2013, p. 264). Although transracial adoptees identify themselves w.

5. Erikson and Identity Crisis

The well-used term "identity crisis" originates from Erik Erikson's fifth stage, identity versus confusion, in his eight stages of epigenetic personality development. This suggests that a large proportion of adolescents do not complete the identity formation process during Erikson's identity versus confusion stage. Some researchers have furthered their investigations in order to compare the developmental continuum of Marcia's identity statuses during adolescence across different cultural groups. Additional cross-cultural research (Taylor and Oskay, 1995) investigated the.

6. Cultural Identity in The Great Gatsby

So naturally cultural identity refers to the identity derived from ones cultural surroundings. He builds his identity based on this money, just as his cultural surroundings would have him do. However it is in fact entirely accurate to the presentation of the American cultural identity within the novel. The way cultural identity within the novel can so easily be defined through something as basic as colour is highly supportive of how easily the cultural identity within the book as a whole has been defined. This supports the idea that cultural identity is very easily defined.

7. Colonization’s effects on Jamaica’s Cultural Identity

Cultural identity is in itself a complex phenomenon, subject to the many changes, which take place in any particular society. Finally, using Rex Nettlford"s works, I will describe how Jamaica has attempted to forge a distinct cultural identity of its own. This ensuing clash of divergent cultures hindered any attempt to create a unifying cultural identity. Where do they find their cultural identity. However, this is what happens, exclusion and lack of cultural identity.

8. How Cultural Identity Is Represented In Tim Winton's Cloudstreet

Cultural identity is represented in a range of ways in Cloudstreet by Tim Winton. The prose fiction elements, such as characterisation and setting are vital in constructing a representation of cultural identity. They are used effectively in this text, as a clear and definite representation of the text"s cultural identity is offered to the reader. Thus, in order to both challenge and confirm aspects of Australia"s cultural identity, it is represented in a variety of ways. Ultimately the importance of the land, more specifically, the river confirms a notorious aspect of Australia"s cultu.

9. Huntington Theory & Disagreement

It describes how these have intersected in the past with religion in determining cultural identity. Apart from the demise of the political ideologies described earlier, Huntington gives six specific reasons for civilizational identity. First, the fundamental and basic levels of identity and differentiation noted above. Fifth, cultural characteristics are "less easily compromised" (Huntington, 1993) than economic or political ideologies. Finally, the rise of "economic regionalism" (Huntington, 1993) tends to enhance cultural identity, as in the "shared foundation of European cultu.

10. Society and Identity

When looked up in the dictionary, the word identity refers to the distinguishing character or personality of an individual that is marked by psychological, social, and cultural factors. People face different hurdles each day that stand in the way of achieving full happiness and oneness, whether it be in the form of social standards, political norms, cultural differences and expectations, and even racial stigmas. Seamus Heaney"s poem, Mid-Term Break, is a great example of how society"s expectations can impact identity because the poem is about a young man who is away at school to obtain.

11. Identity of america

Acceptance of other people and respect for their heritage is changing both an American"s individual identity and America"s cultural identity. In a melting pot, immigrants to America and are culturally melted down and molded into Americans. Their heritage is gone and a great deal of their identity is lost to a generic form of American culture. However, immigrants loose their cultural identity and become like everyone else who lives in America. When people lose their identity, they lose their sense of individuality.

12. Contrast and compare notions of self/identity

Contrast and compare notions of self/identity as outlined in the two perspectives covered in topics 1-4 of your Study Guide (cultural theory and psychological personality theories). Mellor; Chris Shilling)Cultural Theory of Identity/SelfIn Contrast to the Psychological theory, Cultural theorist Edgar & Sedgwick (1999, pp 183-184) states that identity is a response to something external and different. Cultural theorists believe that your identity/self is constructed and depends upon some "other". Our identity is seen as something we construct depending on what we consume.Therefore Cultura.

13. Personal Identity

An identity is the distinguishing character or personality of an individual. Location is one of the key factors of this culturally developed personal identity. However, having lived in California for, now, 6 years, my personal identity has transformed because of this change in location. In Kansas, I grew up with a Southern appeal to my identity. This sense of being rushed into things changed my identity, while keeping the studious nature I adapted to in Kansas.

14. Identities

A person"s identity is composed of many intricate and multifaceted identities. Someone"s speech, dress, manners and social interactions are a direct result of cultural influence. This double view of one"s self is often caused by cultural prejudice. Education is imperative when discussing culture and identity. A culture"s educational opportunities also forms its identity.

15. Social and Cultural Identity Withstands Discrimination

Social and Cultural Identity Withstands DiscriminationCaptivation of a group normally leads to similar characteristics and behavior of that group. The article, "The First Passage" speaks of these Africans who were exploited by Europeans and how they came to develop and sustain various cultural and social forms. The way the Africans were perceived by others made it difficult for them to maintain some form of identity, however they had for themselves their own beliefs and this was the basis of their individuality.Many persons are inclined by nature to associate with others of the same t.

16. Diversity and Gender Identity

A person's identity should not be defined by their biological sex but rather by what they choose to be. "It would make no sense, then, to define gender as the cultural interpretation of sex, if sex itself is a gendered category. gender is not to culture as sex is to nature; gender is also the discursive/cultural means by which "sexed nature" or a "natural sex" is produced and established as "prediscursive", prior to culture, a politically neutral surface on which culture acts"(Butler). Gender identity is not performed just through various acts but is constituted throughou.

17. Managing Cultural Diversity In The Workplace

Managing Cultural Diversity in the WorkplaceCultural diversity, other wise known as multiculturalism, is based on the idea that cultural identities should not be discarded or ignored, but instead, should be maintained and valued. It is a challenge because it requires organizational change; it means fostering a cultural environment that values differences and maximizes the potential of all employees. This perspective starts with the assumption that each cultural group organizes and defines experience within it"s own set of cultural systems.

18. Aboriginality

The importance of Aboriginality within the community services sector is about recognizing and maintaining the cultural identity and connections which Aboriginal children and families require'. The concept of Aboriginality is the survival, identity, and the cultural diversity of Australian Aborigines. The Aboriginal culture is the most important part of the Aborigines identity; it is what defines them as people. With the cultural diversity Australia incorporates it has many impacts on foods, religion and cultural celebrations. They have all had an impact on the Australian.

19. Visual Art and Internet Visual Identity System

is as important a system of human communication and cultural expression as language. The history and development of Visual Identity System and Corporate Identity System will first be present. A. (1997) Visual culture: an introduction 1.The history of Visual Identity System and Corporate Identity System1.1The birth of Corporation Identity System and Visual Identity SystemBefore Corporate Identity design first arose in 1950"s, we can only speak about brands design. The corporations establish their corporate identity and market identity by using Corporation Identity System in order to.

20. Self Reflection

ReflectionsThe subjects of race and cultural identity can mean very different things to different people. Cultural identity, also, varies from person to person. Some may consider cultural identity to be a part of their heritage, while others consider their cultural identity to be the culture they belong to in the here and now. My own personal racial and cultural identities have had a profound influence on the way I have evolved as a person. (Racial and Ethnic Identity, "Challenges and Strategies for Multicultural PracticesaE)During my past two years of teaching, I have taught.

21. The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Al

Racial or ethnic identity could play a major role in one"s life. They both represent one"s cultural existence. It is that ethnic and racial identity that sometimes shapes people"s lives. Some of the cultural barriers and difficulties are represented in the story "The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in HeavenaE by Sherman Alexie.Alexie"s story describes a young Native American male whose ethnic identity became a center of his life. The Indians experiences made him realize that his cultural awareness probably would never stop.Finally, the story paints a portrait of a man whose ethnic i.

22. Gender Identity and Role Awareness in Infancy and Early Childhood

Gender Identity and Gender Role Awareness in Infancy and Early ChildhoodPsychology of Human DevelopmentGender Identity and Gender Role Awareness in Infancy and Early ChildhoodThe sexual development of the children is of great importance to the parents, and they go a long way to see it implemented. Moreover, this is the period referred to as gender identity. The gender identity is a combination of biological and environmental establishments. These gender roles get derived from the cultural setup.

Cultural Identity Essay

Free Essays Must Be Free! TM Cultural Identity Term paper

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Here you can hire an independent writer/researcher to custom write you an authentic essay to your specifications that will pass any plagiarism test (e.g. Turnitin). Waste no more time!

Cultural Identity
'Cultural identity', according to Stuart Hall can be viewed through two different ways. The first position views 'cultural identity' in terms of one shared culture, reflecting typical historical experiences.

'Cultural identity', according to Stuart Hall can be viewed through two different ways. The first position views 'cultural identity' in terms of one shared culture, reflecting typical historical experiences and shared cultural codes. Further, these cultural codes and common historical experiences 'provide us, as 'one people', with stable, unchanging and continuous frames of reference and meaning'(Hall, p.393). The second view relies heavily on the individual's experience of their culture. Through this view, culture is always changing, it is not static

Cultural Identity
'Cultural identity', according to Stuart Hall can be viewed through two different ways. The first position views 'cultural identity' in terms of one shared culture, reflecting typical historical experiences and.

as claimed by the first definition. 'Far from being eternally fixed in some essentialised past, they are subject to the continuous 'play' of history, culture and power' (Hall, p.394). We all write and speak from a particular place and time, from a history and a culture that is specific to us, in other words from a 'position of enunciation'. The 'black experience' which Hall refers to as a commonly shared history and ideology, pendant on colour, is in reality something

Culture Identity
Many people go to different countries. Some of them go for school, some others go for business and some others go for living. However, some people adapt well to a.

which relies heavily on individual experience, and each experience in this case is context positioned. For example, the black experience of a Jamaican and an African living in Britain will be different even though they are both black. Hall talks about the synthesis of cultures, of having an original culture that is dominated by a colonising culture and the result being an integration of the two into something completely new. This 'mixture' or 'hybridity' is the essence of what makes

Analysis of the Human Cultural Identity
Analysis of the Human Cultural Identity This paper is intended to contain the analysis of the human cultural identity, as seen in the following five.

Jamaica what it is today. People can't return to the mystical origins of an idealised time in history and ignore the influences of the colonial invasion. His conclusion is that the purpose of the modern black cinema is to allow us to recognise and explore the different parts that go into constructing our 'cultural identities'. 'This is the vocation of

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Essay: Human Cultural Identity

Essay: Human Cultural Identity

This paper is intended to contain the analysis of the human cultural identity, as seen in the following five historical cultural periods: Enlightenment Culture; Greco-Roman Culture; Judeo-Christian Culture; Renaissance-Reformation Culture; and Industrialization-Modernism Culture. It also embodies examples of each era that are clearly stated, and how they relate to the cultural period.

The cultural identity of the Enlightenment can be described as emphasizing the possibilities of human reason. This idea can be illustrated with such examples as Thomas Jefferson, Denis Diderot, and Protestantism. Thomas Jefferson was considered among one of the most brilliant American exponents of the Enlightenment culture. He had the time and the resources to educate himself in many topics including history, literature, law, architecture, science, and philosophy. He had the motivation and the connections to apply Enlightenment political philosophy to nation-building. Denis Diderot was a French encyclopedist and philosopher, who also composed plays, novels, essays, and art. He greatly influenced other Enlightenment thinkers with his translations of Encyclopedie ou dictionnaire raisonne des sciences, des arts et des metiers, usually known as Encyclopedie. He used this translation as a powerful propaganda weapon against Ecclesiastical authority, and the semifeudal social reforms of the time. Protestantism is a good example also. It is one of the three major divisions of Christianity. It displays the release of traditional religion and the movement to worldly learning and the rise of protests against the controlled way of expressing ones self. It allows the human himself to reason out the way that he thinks, instead of an authority telling him how to do so
therefore, extending his mind.

The Industrialism-Modernism culture is a culture that represents social, economical, and scientific advancement, as well as self-doubt, uncertainty, and alienation. These traits can be characterized with such examples as Werner Heisenberg, Epicureanism, and Eli Whitney. Werner Heisenberg was a German physicist known especially for his development in quantum mechanics and his principle of indeterminacy, or theory of uncertainty. This theory explained how it is impossible to know specifically the position and momentum of a particle, an electron for example, with accuracy. This demonstrates the distinctive uncertainty of the culture. It created a strong trend of mysticism among scientists who perceive it as a violation to cause and effect laws. Epicureanism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Greek philosopher Epicuris. His views coincide with those of Heisenberg in the way that they display the incertitude of how it is impossible to know exactly what things will do or go. In example, he suggested that even atoms are free to move around spontaneously, without order. Any invention or its inventor would fit nicely into this cultural topic. Eli Whitney, for instance, and the cotton gin. This invention was one of the most important, it created a very substantial movement in history. Whitney used scientific knowledge to produce a machine that produced economic progress along with the advancement of less manual labor, and more production for sales.

The Greco-Roman culture is one of a male dominant society, and conflicting obedience views. The idea was that men were controlled by reason, and women were controlled by passion, and that if women were not controlled by the practical reasoning men, that disastrous consequences would occur. The male prevalence in this civilization was evident in all perspectives of life including the arts that were created during this time period. For instance, the women were portrayed as clothed, mysterious, and deviant looking and the men as nude, perfected, and authoritative. This philosophical belief, was taken to the absolute extreme. Men were in a sense, afraid, of the disastrous situations
that women might create if given the chance to do so. Hellenism and Hebraism are other Greek philosophies that deal with the ideas of how to think and act. Hellenism is the stressing to see things as they really are, right thinking, reasoning for oneself, and Hebraism is the stressing of conduct and obedience, right acting, and obeying Gods commandments. These two conflicting views were struggled with by every individual.

The Judeo-Christian culture is one of holy relics, gothic and Romanesque styles, and architectural advances. The holy relics were used to establish a higher status among churches. Such tokens as John the Baptists head could be found in the cathedrals across the civilizations. Another way to achieve status for a church was to build the tallest facility that was possible. The idea was that the bigger the church, the better. This led to styles such as Gothic and Romanesque. The best example of the gothic form is Chartres.

The cathedral used advances like the pointed arch and ribbed vault. The Romanesque form was characterized by flying buttresses and stained glass. The flying buttresses not only enabled the churches to be built higher, but also gave them a majestic look.

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The Renaissance-Reformation culture is that of a revolution of changes in western civilization. Humanism, the revival of classical learning and speculative inquiry beginning in the fifteenth century in Italy during the early Renaissance, disabled the monopolies of the churchs learning, and spread the ability to gain knowledge. The invention of the printing press with moveable type, enabled the supply of books circulating to expand, leading to increased ideas throughout Europe. The Reformation
took many forms in society, but all of them mainly deal with the idea that knowledge is power, and power was obtained easier because of the creation of the printing blocks,therefore, enabling people to change society because they were more educated.

In conclusion, the preceding information illustrates the cultural periods of Enlightenment; Greco-Roman; Judeo-Christian; Renaissance-Reformation; and Industrialization-Modernism. Each have examples clearly stated, and explain how they relate to the period.

Moin! - Essay about cultural identity

'Moin!' - Essay about cultural identity

Hey, I'm from Germany and wrote my essay about my culture/area/language. I have difficulties finding words that just 'fit', even though my dictionary says it would be ok. So if anything sounds plain wrong to you, I would REALLY appreciate it if you could just write a small note telling me about it. THANK YOU.

When you walk on the pier of Hamburg's harbor on a cloudy morning and somebody nods to you, saying 'Moin!', it neither has to mean that he is tired nor that he doesn't know any English - 'Moin' is the Northern German greeting for every time of the day. I picked the image of a dock worker wishing himself back to bed to escape from the rainy day because it is a cliché situation of Northern German language and culture, which I am proud to be a part of.
As a child, I didn't really think about these words in my own vocabulary that were so unfamiliar to my cousins from Heidelberg. I didn't think about being the youngest in my family, the little one, or, according to my parents, the 'l�dde'. My father is definitely a Hamburg lover who doesn't even want to let go our 'Moin' on vacation. In fact, he has piqued my curiosity about Low German in one of these moments when he greeted a hotel receptionist in London. I was almost shocked about the man simply answering 'Good Morning', not knowing that he had just made the connection between my home town and English-speaking countries jump out at me.
Having so many anglistic terms in a people's slang is unique to the area of Hamburg, as much as having a harbor is what makes this city so special: my favorite books about Captain Cook's expeditions or the traditional spice trade taking place at the harbor of Hamburg allowed me to create a vivid imagination of two seamen smoking their cigar while trying to make a conversation. Nowadays, neither a German nor an English-speaking dock worker would care about raising their bottle or 'buddel' to celebrate the get-together.
After my striking enlightenment about the analogy between English and Low German at the said hotel my father taught me much more about this special slang, not forgetting about what it implies to the speaker's attitude. Very few people are still able to speak Low German entirely, but those who can are almost exceptionally afflicted with a straightforward, relaxed and rather tight-lipped personality. Whereas nobody would probably acknowledge me of the latter, I think that people influence their language as much as their language has an influence on them. Using Low German words feels particularly right to me because it reminds me of my family making me feel at home. Just as researchers claim yawning to be an expression for pleasure and relaxation, a y'all in the Southern United States and a 'Moin' in Hamburg has a touch of tradition and originality. To me, it has always been a priority to experience a sense of belonging and to make others feel comfortable whenever I can. I have language found to be a key for achieving this goal, and the best thing about it is that especially my fascination about Low German has shown me that living in Northern Germany is not all about rainy days by the sea.

When you walk on the pier of Hamburg's harbor on a cloudy morning and somebody nods to you, saying 'Moin!', it neither has to mean that he is tired nor that he doesn't know any English - 'Moin' is the Northern German greeting for every time of the day. I picked the image of a dock worker wishing himself back to bed to escape from the rainy day because it is a cliché situation of Northern German language and culture, which I am proud to be a part of.
As a child, I didn't really think about these words in my own vocabulary that were so unfamiliar to my cousins from Heidelberg. I didn't think about being the youngest in my family, the little one, or, according to my parents, the 'l�dde'. My father is definitely a Hamburg lover who doesn't even want to let go our 'Moin' on vacation. In fact, he has piqued my curiosity about Low German in one of these moments when he greeted a hotel receptionist in London. I was almost shocked about the man simply answering 'Good Morning', not knowing that he had just made the connection between my home town and English-speaking countries jump out at me.
Having so many anglistic terms in a people's slang is unique to the area of Hamburg, as much as having a harbor is what makes this city so special: my favorite books about Captain Cook's expeditions or the traditional spice trade taking place at the harbor of Hamburg allowed me to create a vivid imagination of two seamen smoking their cigar while trying to make a conversation. Nowadays, neither a German nor an English-speaking dock worker would care about raising their bottle or 'buddel' to celebrate the get-together.
After my striking enlightenment about the analogy between English and Low German, my father taught me much more about this special slang, not forgetting about what it implies to the speaker's attitude. Very few people are still able to speak Low German entirely, but those who can are almost exceptionally afflicted with a straightforward, relaxed and rather tight-lipped personality. Where as nobody would probably acknowledge me of the latter. I think that people influence their language as much as their language has an influence on them. Using Low German words feels particularly right to me because it reminds me of my family making me feel at home. Just as researchers claim yawning to be an expression for pleasure and relaxation, a y'all in the Southern United States and a 'Moin' in Hamburg has a touch of tradition and originality. To me, it has always been a priority to experience a sense of belonging and to make others feel comfortable whenever I can. I have language found to be a key for achieving this goal, and the best thing about it is that especially my fascination about Low German has shown me that living in Northern Germany is not all about rainy days by the sea.

I quite enjoyed your paper it was quite interesting. First thing I highlighted a few sentences because the word choice was a little off there. I apologize for not being able to provide you with a replacement but I would consider rearranging those sentences. Remember also you don't always have to use long sentences, using commas once in a while is good but try to have more of a combination of short and long sentences. It helps the paper flow better. When you use the name Hamburg be cautious how many times you use it in one paragraph and make sure not to over use it. Very interesting paper as they say " You learn something new everyday."