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Say Yes Tobias Wolff Essay Checker

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Say Yes by Tobias Wolff & Bread by Sandra Cisneros

Say Yes by Tobias Wolff


If two people love each other regardless of any difference they may have, then why are there” lots of things to consider”( paragraph 36)? Answer the question within the context of the story.

According to the context, the “lots of things to consider” is referring to the race, background by the husband. In his opinion, beside whether love this person or not, race, ethics background is also a very important factor to consider whether they should marry or not. He stated that if two people are not from the same race, they are not in the same culture, they have different language. People from different race never know each other.

Compare the husband’s actions to his wife’s reactions. Are these people understanding each other? If he had said yes, would their relationship have changed? If so, how?
From the husband’s action to his wife’s reaction, they didn’t understand each other much even though the husband was trying to show how considerate he is. But he failed to understand what his wife truly wants to hear and wants to see in the conversation on the matter of “whether white people should marry black people.” In the husband’s view he thinks that it was ridiculous to think this kind of question when his wife asked him whether he will marry her if she were black. He thinks that it will never happen. If it happened, his wife will be another person but not the same her anymore. In his views, as he never think that this two race should get marry, he will not allow himself to fall in love or even date a black girl. He is telling the truth and trying to explaining that to his wife. However he failed to realized that that was not what his wife wanted to hear. In fact from the context we can guessed for his wife, it’s not the greatest matter on whether white people should marry black people, what she matters is whether they love each other of not. For her, she thinks that if two people love each other, everything can be solved and race is not a big deal. She wants her husband to agree with this and showed that he will love her and marry her no matter what race she is.

This story, in some ways, is about crossing borders. What re the borders in the story? What do the characters expect in the crossing? In your opinion, who has the most sincere expectation? Suppose your answer with examples from the text.
I guess the border in the story is about the race border. The two characters in the story m one is Spanish, the other one is an Italian. They are expecting to cross not only a language border, and also the race background.

Is it Okay to Date Someone of another Race? Lynn Minton
Find one opinion you strongly disagree with, summarize it and explain why you feel so strongly against it.

I am strongly against Robert’s opinion on stop dating a girl if his parent asked him to do so. In the second last paragraph, Robert mentioned that he will stop date a girl if his parent said “I don’t want you to date this person anymore.” He think that he have to do so as his parents has done so much for them and he was indebted to them. I agreed that our parents have done so much for us. They parenting us, give us the best as they could. However, is it the best they can give and choose for us in the way of choosing our best love in our life? I don’t think so. I think in choosing our own partner in our life, the only one who can judge whether he/she will be suitable is ourselves. I truly agreed that parents will not give some bad comments to let you do something wrong. It is okay to hear parents’ opinions on choosing a girlfriend./boyfriend, but not means that we have to strictly fellow what they said in choosing them. If that person is really the one you love, and that’s your soul mate in your life, you should grab the opportunity to ask her/him stay with you but not let her/him go because of what your parents said.

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Tobias Wolff Essay, Research Paper Tobias Wolff

Tobias Wolff Essay, Research Paper

Tobias Wolff, a boy of a troubled childhood, and a very tough father. Tobias Wolff had no intentions of being a writer from the start; it just seemed to of popped into his life. The Amazing part about this writer is that he was not supported by anyone but himself. His father was against everything that he did, and his brother, Geoffrey, also a writer would always take his fathers side, leaving Tobias on a side of his own. “I wasn’t fair, I always took my father’s side.” Said Geoffrey (Wolff, G; Duke of 144) Geoffrey was known as the ‘Good Brother’ as his father would say. This was wrong for a father to do, parents can’t play favorites, because it leads to one child feeling left out, or rebelling against it like Tobias Wolff did. I feel that the reason for the father favoritism towards Geoffrey Wolff was because Tobias was the younger brother, and younger brothers may be known to be more rebellious. Although, there was nothing said about how Tobias acted in his childhood, he might have been a rebellious child, which may of turned his father towards Geoffrey.

Tobias decided to enlist himself into the army once he couldn’t deal with his father anymore. No, he was not drafted into the army; he chose to enlist himself into the army acting on his own free will. Many say that Tobias did this to escape his troubled childhood and mainly his father. Shortly after Tobias enlisted himself into the army, he was called to battle in the Vietnam War where he experienced many different styles of life. Shortly after the war ended Tobias wrote a novel, most people say it was his best work, titled In Pharoh’s Army: memories of the lost war. The reason this came to be such an amazing work was it contained his wartime experiences from the Vietnam War. Once Tobias completed In Pharoh’s Army, he said, “This is … my last memoir.” It is not understood why Wolff said this it seems as if he were to disappear from the world of writing. Although I could not get a hold of this book, from what I read about it, it was a very vivid memoir which unlike other wartime stories, contained information and experiences from a writer who actually was there, in Vietnam, who experienced the hard times of war.

In the short story Powder by Tobias Wolff, there is a boy and his father, and they are sort of stranded out in the wilderness due to a snow storm, and the father keeps asking his kid questions like we’re gonna make it home, right? And other questions to give the kid confidence in his father. The kid kept responding with ‘umm yeah,’ and saying yes in an unsure way, like he didn’t have confidence in his father bringing him home safely. This ties in with the autobiography This Boys Life in which Tobias Wolff talks about his life, his father and how he began to lose faith in his father during his childhood years. I think that the short story Powder was actually about him and his father’s relationship, and how Tobias lost faith in his father like it said in This Boys Life.

Tobias Wolff’s father was also very forceful, in having things done his way, and him trying to manipulate Tobias into doing things that he wanted. His father said to him: “Your brother tells me you’re thinking of Choate, Personally, I think you’d be happier at Deerfield.” Tobias replied: “Well I just applied, Maybe I won’t get in.” (Wolff, T; Boys life 210) This shows how the father, not only was he forceful, but he made his son Tobias scared of him, in wanting to go to a different school that his father wants him to go to. The way that Tobias responded “Maybe I wont get in” gives me this impression, and also gives his father the impression that he really doesn’t want to go to Choate. Another thing I found interesting was the way that Tobias and his brother would respond to the father with “yes, sir,” and “no, sir.” (Wolff, T; Boys life 21) This make the father seem like he is more than a father, more like a general of the army, or captain of the ship. This brings me to think that the father would yell at Tobias a lot, and beat him too.

“My father took off for Las Vegas with his girlfriend the day after I arrived in California,” this showed how his father wasn’t caring for his son. He left for Vegas with his girlfriend after only seeing his son for a day. The father was or seemed to be insecure when a sheriff gave the school Yale his opinion of Wolff’s father: “Wolff is a boy with considerable ability and very little backbone. He is amiable and good natured, but lacks determination and steadfast.” (Wolff, G; duke of 41) This shows how the father was very insecure of him, and didn’t have a strong head on his shoulders.

Wolff had a fascination with liars, so much that he wrote a story about it: The Barrack’s Thief. Tobias Wolff wrote this award-winning novel in 1984. It is about a bond uniting three soldiers. One of the soldiers turns out to be a liar and a thief who stole the narrator’s wallet, who was a part of the trio. “Wolff is fascinated with liars, and many of his stories pivot on their strange manipulations of reality. Through lying, his characters discover what they are, what they want to be, what they could have been but missed, or what they once were an have now lost.” (Desmond) Also in Powder Wolff uses the father as a liar towards his son. The father said: “Look we’re talking about four, five inches. I’ve taken this car through worse than that.” But, in actuality he really hasn’t done this and his son knows it too.

In an interview with Tobias Wolff, Joan Smith asked him various questions about his feelings and opinions towards the art of writing. One question she asked was: “Do you think that the art of writing can be taught?”(Smith 1) Wolff replied with a simple but firm “No.” I guess he feels that people are either born with the art of writing or they aren’t, there is no one in between who can be taught to become a writer. You are given the gift of writing, not taught. Tobias also said that everyone has their own type of writing in which they are born with, which cannot be taught, but may be worked on or improved, but not changed. The following question by Smith in response to Wolff’s “no” was: “So what do you teach in your writing seminar at Syracuse?” Wolff replied: I try to help people become the best possible editors of their own work, to help them become conscious of things they do well, of things they need to look at again, of the wells of material they have not even begun to dip their buckets into. You want them to ask more of every sentence. These are really values; I suppose frames of thinking rather than discrete bits of information. You don’t teach information in a writing workshop.” This explains his point of there being no way to teach someone to become a writer; all you can do is improve their own technique or style. Wolff teaches a semester a year, usually people in their 20’s or 30’s who want to become better writers, and need someone to push them along the path.

Tobias Wolff had much success in his writing due to his lifelong experiences, especially his childhood. These experiences helped him to give the reader a more vivid, and real description. His two best works: In Pharoh’s Army, and This Boy’s Life both were about experiences in his life such as his childhood, and his experiences in the Vietnam War. The reason for these works becoming so successful is the way it is actually about real persons actual experiences, and readers love to read about other people’s experiences.

Basbanes, Nicholas A. Tobias Wolff: ‘This is … my last memoir’ Article 29. http://web7.infotrac.galegroup.com…rn_29_0_a15845467?sw_aep=pace_main;

Oct. 24, 1994; March 22, 2000.

Skow, John. Memory, too, is an actor, Article 40. http://web7.infotrac.galegroup.com…rn_40_0_a15845467?sw_aep=pace_main;

April 19, 1993; March 22, 2000.

Desmond, John F. Catholicism in Contemporary American Fiction, Article 38.

May 14, 1994; March 22, 2000.

Glass, Elizabeth. Mastering the Memoir: Tobias Wolff, Article 3.

July, 1997; March 22, 2000.

Malin, Irving. The vintage book of Contemporary American Short Stories, Article 17. http://web7.infotrac.galegroup.com…rn_17_0_a16559373?sw_aep=pace_main;

Spring, 1995; March 22, 2000

Meyer, Michael. The Compact Bedford introduction to Literature, “Powder,” Tobias Wolff, p.525. 2000 by Bedford/St. Martin’s.

Wolff, Tobias. In the Garden of North American Martyrs. 1945, The Ecco Press, New York. 175pgs.

Smith, Joan. “The Salon Interview – Speaking into the Unknown,” http://www.salon.com/dec96/interview961216.html. 3pgs.

Wolff, Tobias. Hunters in the snow, http://www.bnl.com/shorts/stories/huntsnow.html. 1997 B&L Associates, Renton, Washington, 12 pgs. (Gary Lindquist—Comments).

Wolff, Tobias. This Boys Life, 1989 Grove Press, New York, NY, 288pgs.

Wolff, Geoffrey. The Duke of Deception – memories of my father, Random House inc. 1979, 275 pgs.

Say Yes

Say Yes

They spice up their marriage through routine arguments, with the expectation of romance later on. When they first start the night’s arguments, the husband notices a “look” in his wife’s eyes that tells him, through experience. “he should keep his mouth shut”(444). The husband never does though. “Actually it made him talk more”(444). This is not the first time there has been a battle of words between them as shown when after a particularly touching debate. the wife goes into the living room and the husband then hears “her turning the pages of a magazine”(446). Knowing by the sound of it “that she was too angry to be actually reading it”(446). Showing that this had happened before between them, he thinks “she didn’t snap through the pages the way he would have done”(446). It is also shown that the argument will be resolved in time when the husband says, “It’s shallow”(445), referring to not only his wife’s cut thumb, but also their arguments. He then says, “Tomorrow you won’t even know it’s there”(445). He implies that the argument isn’t that important, and she would forget about the whole thing soon enough. For the night. however, things have been made somewhat more exciting than before.

Several symbols convey the couple’s feelings. and what the ultimate result of their arguing will be like. The wife seems to mold their conversation in the direction she wants to make it go when she “began washing the bowl again, turning it as though she were shaping it”(444). The husband’s resentfulness at many of her words and the turn in the conversation have made the mood dull just as “the water had gone flat and grey”(445) in the sink. Inevitably the heat of the dispute was at hand but would cool in turn like the metal of the silverware they were washing. As the heat of the water hit it, it was “darkened to pale blue, then turned silver again”(445). While the cut had been painful at the moment, it hadn’t been deep and would not be noticed in time. The dogs in the alley were also symbolic of the couple’s relationship. The female having something in her mouth and tossing it and growling is similar to what the couple is doing. They play fight together and growl a lot but in the end they trot off together happily. The symbolism used provides an added insight into the various stages of the story.

Making up and the resulting romance later on that night were the couple’s inevitable reason behind their argument. The husband cleaned the kitchen which resulted in it looking new, “the way it looked when they were first shown the house”(446). Thus implying that it was a start of a renewal of their relationship later on. When he later went outside he thought of “how well they knew each other, and his throat tightened so that he could hardly breathe”(446). How unimportant the arguing is in the total scheme of things. While the dogs in the alley had growled and wrestled together, they had later trotted off together. So does the couple makeup peaceably as if nothing serious had taken place, and they start anew. The spice in their marriage from the arguments adds an undeniable renewal of their passions. Later on as they come to an understanding. the husband lies in bed awaiting his wife. “His heart pounded the way it had on their first night together”(447). Their romance kindled afresh.

As the years pass them by, the couple struggles to keep romance alive and their relationship zestful. The couple’s routine arguments, the symbols provided in the story and their making up shows their endeavor to keep the relationship refreshing. Thus renewing the spice of excitement and the spark of their passions together.

Wolff, Tobias. “Say Yes .” Literature. Structure, Sound. and Sense ; 7th Edition. Ed. Thomas R. Arp. Fort Worth: Harcourt, 1998. 444-447.

Say Yes Analysis

Say Yes Analysis

Wolff conveys his story primarily through dialogue. Character, motivation, psychological perspective, and insight, as well as meaning, are revealed mainly through utterances of the characters. They talk in the terse, clipped sentences and fragments of sentences of those who have been married for a long time and have little need for words to communicate with each other. At the same time, because they take opposing viewpoints, some verbal conversation is necessary simply to further the conflict and increase the tension.

Like most couples who have been married a long time, each knows much of what the other will say. Toward that end the author, telling the story from an omniscient point of view, indicates that both characters know the effects of their own statements before they make them. Therefore, they willingly enter the argument—and they willfully keep it going to move it to their final separation at the end of the story, which is also the evident end of their relationship.

The setting of the story is the ordinary kitchen of a typical modern home. It has no distinctive characteristics because the author is writing about all such kitchens in all such houses, and about the inevitable breakdown of such relationships. The spotlessness of the linoleum and other fixtures recalls the sterility of Ernest Hemingway’s “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place” (1933).

Wolff uses two obvious symbols. In cutting herself, Anne is offering sacrificial blood to the relationship. It falls on the floor (that is, the underpinning) of their home and relation. The husband succeeds in cleaning up the blood, but not in cleaning up the mess. When the husband takes out the trash and sees two dogs fight over it, the animals are reenacting what has just occurred in the kitchen. Human nature is animalistic. The selfishness of the dogs in refusing to share the garbage reflects the determination of the human couple to force each other to “say yes”—to agree to be submissive. The consequence of such conduct is invariably separation. The couple not only learn that they are strangers to each other, but that this has always been the case between men and women.

The Republican Years
The 1980s was a decade led by Republican thinking and policy. Ronald Reagan took office as president of the.

(The entire section is 762 words.)

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Challener, Daniel D. Stories of Resilience in Childhood: The Narratives of Maya Angelou, Maxine Hong Kingston, Richard Rodriguez, John Edgar Wideman, and Tobias Wolff. New York: Garland, 1997.

Cornwall, John. “Wolff at the Door.” Sunday Times Magazine (London), September 12, 1993, 28-33.

DePietro, Thomas. “Minimalists, Moralists, and Manhattanites.” Hudson Review 39 (Autumn, 1986): 487-494.

Hannah, James. Tobias Wolff: A Study of the Short Fiction. New York: Twayne, 1996.

Lyons, Bonnie, and Bill Oliver. “An Interview with Tobias.

(The entire section is 87 words.)

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Tobias WolffS Say Yes Essay Research Paper

Tobias WolffS Say Yes Essay Research Paper

Tobias Wolff?S ?Say Yes? Essay, Research Paper Brian Bertolucci Eng 1B T-Th 12:30-2:00 9/28/99 Essay #1 A Point by Point Analytical View of Tobias Wolff’s “Say Yes” “Say Yes” is an emotional sorry of love and its pitfalls. The husband loves his wife dearly but fails to really know that all she wants to hear is affirmation of her proposal of love despite the racial undertone involve. The Husband does not come to the realization of this concept until the end of the story when he accepts the proposal and puts forth the effort to “make it up” to Ann The story begins around dusk, one evening in a non descript kitchen on El Camino Street in some unnamed American ghetto. The mood of the evening soon changes for the worse. While a husband and a wife wash dishes they

quibble about inter-racial marriage, specifically Caucasian and African. Ann, the wife, proposes a question, “…I’m black, but still me, and we fall in love. Will you marry me?” Tobias Wolff parallels the narrative tone with the considerate loving attitude of the Husband, which makes the delicate subject matter of inter-racial marriage easier to confront in the short story “Say Yes”. There are only two Characters mentioned in the story. The Husband has extensive knowledge of African-American culture, although not being of that particular race himself. He is considerate and devoted to his wife Ann. This is displayed while helping his wife with the dishes every night and assisting with the remainder of the housework. A friend of his wife’s congratulated her on having

such a considerate husband; it was true he “tried” to show consideration towards his wife through his works. The second individual is Ann. Wolff does not divulge Ann’s everyday character, but displays Ann’s “indifference” to her Husband’s assessment of the subject matter. As Ann turns “the pages of a magazine….she was too angry to be actually reading it, but she didn’t snap through the pages the way he would have done.”, displaying her displeasure at her Husband’s sentiment that it was wrong to marry out of racial classification. Wolff writes the short story from the first person perspective of the Husband who, “…went to school with blacks … worked with blacks and lived on the same street with blacks and … always gotten along just fine.”,

however; Wolff did not intend for the reader to perceive that the Husband is racist. Although his wife feels two cultures with two distinct backgrounds could “know” one another; her Husband’s insight of multi-cultured relationships remained unchanged. Although in love, two people of differing races or cultures could never conceptually “know” each other. The Husband loves his wife and the narrator writes through the tenderness of the Husband’s eye. When Ann slices her finger re-washing the silverware, all animosity is lost as he scrambles up stairs to get her a Band-Aid as a peace offering to cease the argument. He finishes the cleaning in the kitchen and goes as far as to mop the floor while he waits for the frustration and anger to subside in his Wife. The author

carefully crafts the story so that every detail contributes to a certain unique or single effect, whether it is as complex as irony or as simple as depiction of feelings. The Husband describes his absolute love for Ann as he reminisces about the years he spent with her and how deeply he “knows” her, “… his throat tightened so that he could hardly breathe. His face and neck began to tingle. Warmth flooded his chest.” This word picture vividly presents the picture of a man who in his heart loves his wife. There are examples exemplifying the sharp contrast between the Husband’s perception that he and his wife “know” each other and the ironic certainty that his wife doesn’t feel the same way. The husband states, “A person from their culture and a person from our

Реферат на тему Tobias WolffS Say Yes Essay Research Paper

Tobias Wolff?S ?Say Yes? Essay, Research Paper

A Point by Point Analytical View of Tobias Wolff’s “Say Yes”

“Say Yes” is an emotional sorry of love and its pitfalls. The husband loves his wife dearly but fails to really know that all she wants to hear is affirmation of her proposal of love despite the racial undertone involve. The Husband does not come to the realization of this concept until the end of the story when he accepts the proposal and puts forth the effort to “make it up” to Ann

The story begins around dusk, one evening in a non descript kitchen on El Camino Street in some unnamed American ghetto. The mood of the evening soon changes for the worse. While a husband and a wife wash dishes they quibble about inter-racial marriage, specifically Caucasian and African. Ann, the wife, proposes a question, “…I’m black, but still me, and we fall in love. Will you marry me?” Tobias Wolff parallels the narrative tone with the considerate loving attitude of the Husband, which makes the delicate subject matter of inter-racial marriage easier to confront in the short story “Say Yes”.

There are only two Characters mentioned in the story. The Husband has extensive knowledge of African-American culture, although not being of that particular race himself. He is considerate and devoted to his wife Ann. This is displayed while helping his wife with the dishes every night and assisting with the remainder of the housework. A friend of his wife’s congratulated her on having such a considerate husband; it was true he “tried” to show consideration towards his wife through his works.

The second individual is Ann. Wolff does not divulge Ann’s everyday character, but displays Ann’s “indifference” to her Husband’s assessment of the subject matter. As Ann turns “the pages of a magazine….she was too angry to be actually reading it, but she didn’t snap through the pages the way he would have done.”, displaying her displeasure at her Husband’s sentiment that it was wrong to marry out of racial classification.

Wolff writes the short story from the first person perspective of the Husband who, “…went to school with blacks … worked with blacks and lived on the same street with blacks and … always gotten along just fine.”, however; Wolff did not intend for the reader to perceive that the Husband is racist. Although his wife feels two cultures with two distinct backgrounds could “know” one another; her Husband’s insight of multi-cultured relationships remained unchanged. Although in love, two people of differing races or cultures could never conceptually “know” each other.

The Husband loves his wife and the narrator writes through the tenderness of the Husband’s eye. When Ann slices her finger re-washing the silverware, all animosity is lost as he scrambles up stairs to get her a Band-Aid as a peace offering to cease the argument. He finishes the cleaning in the kitchen and goes as far as to mop the floor while he waits for the frustration and anger to subside in his Wife.

The author carefully crafts the story so that every detail contributes to a certain unique or single effect, whether it is as complex as irony or as simple as depiction of feelings. The Husband describes his absolute love for Ann as he reminisces about the years he spent with her and how deeply he “knows” her, “… his throat tightened so that he could hardly breathe. His face and neck began to tingle. Warmth flooded his chest.” This word picture vividly presents the picture of a man who in his heart loves his wife.

There are examples exemplifying the sharp contrast between the Husband’s perception that he and his wife “know” each other and the ironic certainty that his wife doesn’t feel the same way. The husband states, “A person from their culture and a person from our culture could never really know each other.” “Like you know me?” the wife asks. “Yes. Like I know you.” the husband replies, yet he would still not marry her if she was African. In the conclusion of the story the Husband gives up and whispers to Ann that he would marry her even if she were African. Although the Husband loves his wife, he realizes that he does not “know” his wife as,” the sound of someone moving through the house, a stranger.” Wolff creates a situation between the two where the husband is looking to settle the argument, whereas the wife just wants to hear yes to the proposal. Ann doesn’t think that her husband will say yes and when he does she realized that they still don’t know each other. It takes the Husband until the end of the story to figure this out, when his wife, the stranger, now comes to bed. The story does end with him going to bed with this new strange wife, but also leads to a conclusion of rediscovery and renewal for the marriage.

Wolff, Tobias, “Say Yes”

Perrine’s Literature: Structure sound and sense, ed. Thomas R. Arp

7th edition Harcourt Brace: New York: 1998.

Say Yes-Tobias Wolff - College Essays - 737 Words

Say Yes----Tobias Wolff

If two people love each other regardless of any difference they may have, then why are there" lots of things to consider"( paragraph 36)? Answer the question within the context of the story. According to the context, the "lots of things to consider" is referring to the race, background by the husband. In his opinion, beside whether love this person or not, race, ethics background is also a very important factor to consider whether they should marry or not. He stated that if two people are not from the same race, they are not in the same culture, they have different language. People from different race never know each other.

Compare the husband's actions to his wife's reactions. Are these people understanding each other? If he had said yes, would their relationship have changed? If so, how? From the husband's action to his wife's reaction, they didn't understand each other much even though the husband was trying to show how considerate he is. But he failed to understand what his wife truly wants to hear and wants to see in the conversation on the matter of "whether white people should marry black people." In the husband's view he thinks that it was ridiculous to think this kind of question when his wife asked him whether he will marry her if she were black. He thinks that it will never happen. If it happened, his wife will be another person but not the same her anymore. In his views, as he never think that this two race should get marry, he will not allow himself to fall in love or even date a black girl. He is telling the truth and trying to explaining that to his wife. However he failed to realized that that was not what his wife wanted to hear. In fact from the context we can guessed for his wife, it's not the greatest matter on whether white people should marry black people, what she matters is whether they love each other of not. For her, she thinks that if two people love each other, everything can be solved and race is not a big deal. She wants her.

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understanding of the dictionary definition. They know that this powerful commitment is the most intimate manner in which to show not only one’s love for another, but also one’s steadfast honor in remaining true to this lifetime promise. In Tobias Wolff’s “SayYes ,” a wife and her husband, while washing the dinner dishes, find themselves straying onto the topic of interracial marriage. Quickly, the tension between the two escalates into more than.

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Sagy Sheein Pro.Crawford “Bullet in the Brain” “Bullet in the Brain” is a short story written by TobiasWolff . The story is about a book critic named Anders, while waiting in a long line at the bank he is the victim of an armed robbery and gets shot and killed. The story is divided in to two parts, and this division allows the reader to see a contrast between two parts of main character’s personality. I want to argue in this essay that the combination of.

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I Saw Her First In Tobias Wolff's "Two Boy's and a Girl," the main character, Gilbert, envies his friend Rafe, wanting what Rafe has instead of accepting and trying to enjoy his own life. His sarcastic way of coping with this self-made problem develops as he looks after Rafe's girlfriend and convertible while he is away. Although not accepted by Gilbert, the reader learns that even Rafe, whose life seems to be perfect, has problems of his own. For example, Rafe possesses the.

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The Effects of Symbols On "SayYes " The author of the short story "SayYes ," TobiasWolff . uses a number of symbols to express his different views on racism throughout the story. Wolff uses this literary device to express a message to his readers. Symbols, something representing something else by association resemblance or convention, are used efficiently in this short story.

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sayYES ’ to homosexual marriage everyone can marry the person they love, the murderers, the corrupt official, the beggar. the thief. the old spinster can get married. Gay, however, cannot. marriage is the last process and expression of love. Traditionally, marriage is an institution and promise about a man and a woman to live forever and form a kinship under the law. Our city – Hong Kong thinks homosexuality is unacceptable. Homosexuality can be classified.

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destiny; some young people choose to fight against all obstacles to reach goals that will lead to a successful fortune, while some will walk an uneasy way and repeat themselves in the misery of self-destructiveness and self-sabotaging behaviors. In Tobias Wolff’s memoir This Boy’s Life, the author presents a life that is built up on continuous self-destructive decisions; making himself his own worst enemy and causing all kinds of pitiful situations which he hopes to change and.

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Say Yes - Short Stories for Students

Say Yes Say Yes

Tobias Wolff is perhaps best known by the American reading public for his memoir This Boys Life, whichwas later made into an acclaimed movie, but his literary reputation was first established on the merit of his short stories. He is still primarily known for these short stories, in which he depicts many characters’ voices and a wide range of emotions. Since the early 1980s, Wolff has produced several collections of short stories. These fictions focus on the important relationships and the moral choices in everyday people’s lives: men and women, husbands and wives, parents and children. As scholar Marilyn C. Wesley writes in the Dictionary of Literary Biography, Wolffwrites “about the basic needs of Everyman, written with a respect that Everyman deserves.”

Wolff has often been likened to other writers of his generation such as Raymond Carver and Richard Ford. In his short stories, Wolff practices a direct, even nondramatic, style of writing. This is certainly the case in his story “Say Yes,” which takes as its backdrop an average evening in the life of a married couple. When the conversation delves into an issue on which the couple do not agree, the relationship experiences a newfound rockiness. The husband’s reaction to this argument demonstrates the secret undercurrents that run through relationships.

Tobias Wolff was born in 1945 in Alabama. His parents divorced when he was a boy. Wolff’s mother retained custody of him, while his brother Geoffrey— who also became a writer—lived with their father. As a child, Wolff traveled with his mother, Rosemary, to the Pacific Northwest, where she remarried. This period of Wolff’s life is recounted in This Boy’s Life: A Memoir, whichwas later made into a film.

Wolff briefly attended preparatory school on the East Coast, but he was expelled. From 1964 through 1968, Wolff served as a lieutenant with the U.S. Army Special Forces (Green Berets) in Vietnam. He later recounted his wartime experiences in the memoir In the Pharaoh’s Army: Memoirs of the Lost War .

Wolff earned his B.A. in 1972 and then his M.A. from Oxford University three years later. That year, his first book, Ugly Rumours, waspublished in London. Also that year, he won a prestigious Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University. From 1975 through 1978, he worked as a Stegner lecturer at Stanford, and in 1978, he received a second M.A.

Wolff began publishing regularly with the 1981 appearance of the short story collection In the Garden of the North American Martyrs. Overthe next four years, Wolff published two more short story collections. His stories also appeared in numerous magazines, and several have been selected for inclusion in the O. Henry Prize Stories series. Wolff has also been awarded numerous grants, such as those from the National Endowment for the Arts, and has won national prizes.

In 1980, Wolff and his family moved to New York State, where he became a writer in residence for Syracuse University. Wolff remained there for seventeen years, until he was offered a position at Stanford University as the head of the graduate writing program. Wolff has lived in northern California since then, where he continues to work primarily on short stories.

The unnamed husband and his wife, Ann, are washing and drying the dishes when they begin to discuss interracial marriages. The husband says that he

thinks it is a bad idea for African Americans and whites to marry. His wife wants to know why he thinks so, and the narrator immediately believes that she is implying he is a racist. She responds that she doesn’t think he is racist, but she just doesn’t see what is wrong with interracial marriage. The husband says that whites and African Americans come from different cultural backgrounds, so they can never really know and understand each other. He also believes that foreigners should not marry Americans, because they come from a completely different background.

Ann, clearly upset by the conversation, cuts her hand when she plunges it back in the water to continue washing dishes. The husband runs to the bathroom to get first-aid equipment. He cleans out the cut, which turns out to be shallow and fairly superficial. He feels he has done something good by reacting to the accident so quickly, and he hopes that she will return the favor by not picking up the conversation again. Ann, however, states that he wouldn’t have married her if she were African American. The husband avoids answering by telling her that if she were, in fact, African American, the two probably wouldn’t have even met because they would have traveled in different social circles. Ann persists in her line of hypothetical reasoning, imagining that she were African American, and they did meet, and they did fall in love. The husband responds with what he considers to be reason: that if Ann were African American, she wouldn’t be her. Ann acknowledges this to be true but continues with her questioning, wanting to know if he would still marry her if she were African American. The husband says he is thinking about it, but Ann says that she knows he won’t marry her. When pressed, he admits that he wouldn’t marry her. Ann thanks him for answering and then goes to the living room and reads a magazine.

The husband knows that his wife is angry, and her feigned indifference to him hurts him. He decides he must show his own indifference to her, so he cleans up the kitchen and takes out the garbage. Outside, looking at the lights of the town, he feels ashamed that he let his wife get him into a fight. He thinks about how close they are and how well they know each other. He even does not bother to throw rocks, as he usually does, at the dogs that had knocked over the garbage can.

When he goes back inside, the house is dark, and Ann is in the bathroom. He stands outside of the door and apologizes, promising he will make it up to her. She asks how he will do that. Not expecting this question, he whispers that he will marry her, knowing he had to come up with the right answer. She says, “We’ll see,” and tells him to go on to bed. He gets into their bed, and then hears her say from the hallway to turn off the light. He does so, and the room goes dark. He hears Ann move across the room, but he can see nothing. The room is silent, as he listens for another sound—the sound of a stranger.

Ann Husband

The husband in the story is generally an unsympathetic character. He appears to have racist feelings and seems to be dishonest with himself. He claims to appreciate the stability his life with Ann provides him, but he still makes efforts to undermine it. He refuses to take responsibility for his actions. Throughout the evening, he is seen to be less than a genuine person; he does things for effect rather than out of a genuine, sincere desire. Within the confines of the story, his most significant trait is his rejection of his wife, which she takes quite seriously, much to his surprise. By the end of the story, the husband demonstrates yet another shift in mood: excitement as he realizes that, in certain ways, his wife is unknowable to him. The final scene has him awaiting his wife in their darkened bedroom, imagining that she is a stranger—a fact that he seems to embrace, as demonstrated by the excited pounding of his heart.

Wife

The wife in the story, Ann, gets angry at her husband when he says he would not marry her if she were an African American. Ann demonstrates what she feels and thinks through her actions. When she is angry at what she perceives to be her husband’s racism, her discomfort shows as she thoughtlessly plunges her hands into the dishwater and cuts her thumb. After she retires to the living room, after her husband says he wouldn’t marry her, she makes her feelings clear by deliberately scrutinizing the pages of her magazine. When she goes to bed, she makes clear the deep wound her husband has inflicted upon her by refusing to answer his knock on the bathroom door and not responding to his subsequent apology. By the end of the story, though he has said he would marry her, she does not commit to forgiving him. She even indicates that she might not accept “his offer” of marriage. She does venture into their bedroom, where her husband is already in bed, but only on the condition that her husband turn off the light. This request seems to indicate her alienation from him: she may not want him to see her, since he can’t truly seeher; or she may not want to see the man she married.

Racism

The idea of racism is a theme in the story, for the implication of the husband’s racism is what causes the couple to quarrel. The wife dislikes her husband’s beliefs that African Americans are different from whites. He maintains that it is not that he is prejudiced against African Americans, but that they come from a different culture than white people— “they even have their own language.” His protestation that “I like hearingthem talk”—because it makes him feel happy—reveals much about his personality: his belief that African Americans are inherently foreign to whites, his condescending attitude, and his sense of otherness from himself— he needs something completely unlike himself to bring him pleasure.

The husband’s negative response to Ann’s question of whether he would marry her were she African American indicates the pervasive and destructive nature of his racism. Though the story provides no other context against which to view his relations with people who are not white, his instance of refusing to marry his wife shows that he thinks that African Americans are not like he and his wife, but perhaps more importantly, that for him, love does not go deeper than skin color—deeper than the superficial. Though he claims that he can only love her if she is white because otherwise “you wouldn’t be you,” the implication is that he wouldn’t love a black Ann. …