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Firdaus Kanga Essay Writing

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Firdaus Kanga

Firdaus Kanga

Firdaus Kanga (born 1960, Bombay ) is a writer and actor who lives in London. He has written a novel, Trying to Grow a semi-autobiographical novel set in India and a travel book Heaven on Wheels about his experiences in the United Kingdom. [ 1 ] Trying to Grow was later turned into an award-winning BBC-BFI film, Sixth Happiness . for which Kanga wrote the screenplay, and in which he starred.

Early life

Kanga was born in a Parsi family in Bombay in 1959. He adjusted to his disability early in life, and was tough mentally. Till fourth grade Kanga was tutored at home, after which he joined the Campion School, Mumbai. [ 1 ]

Sixth Happiness - BFI/BBC Film

Sixth Happiness is about Brit - a boy born with brittle bones who never grows taller than four feet. It is also about the Parsi or Parsees - descendants of the Persian empire who were driven out of Persia by an Islamic invasion more than a thousand years ago and settled in western India. Parsees had a close relationship with the British during the years of the Raj. Brit is named by his mother, both after his brittle bones, and in tribute to his mother's love of Britain. The depiction of Brit's parents as ardent Anglophiles with fond memories of the Raj and WW2, presents a glimpse of a non-stereotypical Indian family. This, along with the story of a young disabled man's sexual awakening as family life crumbles around him makes Sixth Happiness an interesting exploration of modern, urban India. Kanga's creation - both as writer and performer - resists drawing the main star Brit as either martyr or victim. Brit is bright, spiky, opinionated and selfish with a razor-sharp wit. He prefers the Kama Sutra to Shakespeare and does not allow gender or disability to come in the way of his desire for sex and love.

Television

Firdaus Kanga has presented documentaries, such as Double the Trouble, Twice the Fun (d. Pratibha Parmar. 1992), a provocative documentary drama that explored sexuality and disability. The film was broadcast as part of Channel Four's lesbian and gay series Out. Taboo, another documentary presented by Kanga, explored religion and disability - for instance, the Hindu notions of karma - exploring how religion can exclude and patronize people of disability.

Kanga's history and cultural contribution

Firdaus Kanga was born with osteogenesis imperfecta. a condition also known as brittle bones disease. This left him with several painful fractures throughout his childhood and adolescence in India. He grew up in a family of five, in a one bedroom Bombay apartment. He spoke out against the Indian socialist consensus, and was a supporter of Reagan and Thatcher politics. Kanga's first major achievement was Trying to Grow (also translated into French [Grandir] and Italian) a novel exploring disability, sexuality and culture. In India where religion still dictates most cultural acts, Kanga's novel broke several taboos - portraying disabled people with healthy, rich sexual appetites. Kanga publicly rejected Hindu notions of karma (laying responsibility for suffering at what humans may have done in their last birth) often foisted on disabled people. Kanga was one of the first few public figures in India who stood up for the views of gay people, celebrating sexuality, in a society that still criminalizes, though hardly, if ever, prosecutes homosexuality .

Influential Indian writing

Kanga was selected to be part of The Vintage Book of Indian Writing: 1947-97 - a major anthology of the work of the most important and influential Indian writers of the last 50 years. This volume was published by Salman Rushdie and Elizabeth West to coincide with the anniversary of India's independence.

Kanga was born in Bombay in the westernised Parsi community, and his writing centres on dealing with disability and sexuality.

References

Other articles

StateMaster - Encyclopedia: Firdaus Kanga

Firdaus Kanga is a writer who lives in London. He has written a novel, Trying To Grow and a travel book Heaven On Wheels about his experiences in the United Kingdom. Trying To Grow was later turned into a film, Sixth Happiness, which Kanga wrote the screenplay for and acted in. Jump to: navigation, search The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England.


Kanga was born in Bombay in the westernised Parsi community and his writing centres around dealing with disability and sexuality. This article or section should be merged with Mumbai Mumbai (previously known as Bombay) is the worlds most populous conurbation, and is the sixth most populous agglomeration in the world. Parsi is: A person from Pars (the middle-Persian word for Fars), a region now within the geographical boundaries of Iran, and is roughly the original homeland of the Persian people.


Article by Kanga on the BBC website

Categories: Parsi | UK writer stubs


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Firdaus Kanga

Firdaus Kanga

Firdaus Kanga (b. 1960, Bombay ) is a writer and actor who lives in London. He has written a novel, "Trying to Grow" a semi-autobiographical novel set in India and a travel book "Heaven on Wheels" about his experiences in the United Kingdom. "Trying to Grow" was later turned into am award-winning BBC-BFI film, " Sixth Happiness ", for which Kanga wrote the screenplay, and in which he starred. Alexander Walker of the Evening Standard said of " Sixth Happiness ": "Firdaus Kanga's performance has battery pack power. a remarkable true story."

ixth Happiness - BFI/BBC Film

" Sixth Happiness " is about Brit - a boy born with brittle bones who never grows taller than four feet. It is also about the Parsi or Parsees - descendants of the Persian empire who were driven out of Persia by an Islamic invasion more than a thousand years ago and settled in western India. Parsees had a close relationship with the British during the years of the Raj. Brit is named by his mother, both after his brittle bones, and in tribute to his mother's love of Britain. The depiction of Brit's parents as ardent Anglophiles with fond memories of the Raj and WW2, presents a glimpse of a non-stereotypical Indian family. This, along with the moving story of a young disabled man's sexual awakening as family life crumbles around him makes " Sixth Happiness " an interesting exploration of modern, urban India. Kanga's creation - both as writer and performer - resists drawing the main star Brit as either martyr or victim. Brit is bright, spiky, opinionated and selfish with a razor-sharp wit. He prefers the Kama Sutra to Shakespeare and does not allow gender or disability to come in the way of his desire for sex and love.

With powerhouse performances from Kanga and Faress, and featuring great support from Nina Wadia (Goodness Gracious Me), Indira Varma (Bride and Prejudice, Kama Sutra) and Meera Syal (The Kumars at No. 42), Sixth Happiness manages to turn just about every stereotype about India, disability and sexuality on its head.

Firdaus Kanga has presented documentaries, such as Double the Trouble, Twice the Fun (d. Pratibha Parmar, 1992), a provocative documentary drama that explored sexuality and disability. The film was broadcast as part of Channel Four's lesbian and gay series Out. Taboo, another documentary presented by Kanga, explored religion and disability - for instance, the Hindu notions of karma - exploring how religion can exclude and patronise people of disability.

Kanga's history and cultural contribution

Firdaus Kanga was born with Osteogenesis imperfecta. a condition also known as brittle bones disease. This left him with several painful fractures throughout his childhood and adolescence in India. He grew up in a family of five, in a one bedroom Bombay apartment. He spoke out against the Indian socialist consensus, and was a supporter of Reagan and Thatcher politics. Kanga's first major achievement was "Trying to Grow" (also translated into French [Grandir] and Italian) a novel exploring disability, sexuality and culture. In India where religion still dictates most cultural acts, Kanga's novel broke several taboos - portraying disabled people with healthy, rich sexual appetites. Kanga publicly rejected Hindu notions of karma (laying responsibility for suffering at what humans may have done in their last birth) often foisted on disabled people. Kanga was one of the first few public figures in India who stood up for the views of gay people, celebrating sexuality, in a society that still criminalises, though hardly, if ever, prosecutes homosexuality .

Influential Indian writing

Kanga was selected to be part of The Vintage Book of Indian Writing: 1947-97 - a major anthology of the work of the most important and influential Indian writers of the last 50 years. This volume was published by Salman Rushdie and Elizabeth West to coincide with the anniversary of India's independence.

Kanga was born in Bombay in the westernised Parsi community, and his writing centres on dealing with disability and sexuality.

*Screenonline name|id=561320|name=Firdaus Kanga biography and credits
* [http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/4640847.stm Article by Kanga on the BBC website ]
* [http://www.bfi.org.uk/booksvideo/video/details/sixthhappiness/ Sixth Happiness -- a BBC-BFI film that won the EMMA award ]

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010 .

BBC NEWS

Throughout South Asia, homosexuality has been a taboo subject. There are signs in some areas that gay people are now becoming more open - but that is not always the case. In the latest in a series of articles about gay people from the region, Firdaus Kanga reflects on his life.

Firdaus Kanga felt the hairpin bends of passion

Born into a Parsi family in Mumbai (Bombay), Kanga now lives in London where he works as a writer and actor. As a child he was diagnosed with a rare bone disease.

There were many things I could not do as a boy - the most absurd of these was not being able to break a biscuit.

There was something about the sound, the snap that always reminded me of those moments when I would crack a rib or break a hip, which happened almost as often as the festivals that sprinkled the Indian calendar.

We were the Parsis of Bombay which meant we could celebrate Eid and Diwali and Christmas with as much pleasure as our own Navroz (New Year) we had brought with us from Persia so many centuries ago.

That first relationship ended in the kind of pain that I had never known

Parsi World - Essay by Shoaib2

Parsi World Essay

The Criterion: An International Journal in English

Depiction of Parsi World – View in Select Short Stories of Rohinton Mistry’s
Tales from Firozsha Baag
B. Tamilselvi
Assistant Professor of English,
SFR College for Women,
Sivakasi – 626123.
Virudhunagar District.
Tamilnadu.
India.

Rohinton Mistry is an interesting case of a writer who, as a Parsi in India and as an
Indian in Canada, is part of minority or ethnic culture in both the countries. For him therefore,
the minority status is a felt and fated experience in both the worlds. It is not surprising therefore
that he does not attempt to focalize or problematize questions of marginality in his writings.
Mistry writes about the world he knows most intimately: the world of the Parsis of Bombay
within which he grew up.
There are so many Indian English Parsi writers like Saros Dara Cowasjee, Boman Desai,
Firdaus Kanga, Farrukh Dhondy, Dina Metha, Gieve Patel, Keki Nusserwanjee Daruwalla,
Rohinton Mistry and others. Their works exhibit consciousness of their community in a way that
the community emerges as protagonists to the background. Among the leading Parsi writers,
Rohinton Mistry pays more attention to the depiction of his community and his fictional works
are replete with numerous details of Parsi life culture and religion. Like all other Parsi writers,
Mistry is concerned with the preservation of the ethnic identity of his community. He presents
his community through the different narratives of his characters who invariably express their
concerns for the community and the changes that affect it. By focusing on their community in
their narratives, they preserve and protect themselves and thus throw light on the existing reality.
Post – independence Parsi writing.

How and why did early Indian writers during Pre-independance era commenced writing in English?

English is a foreign language but since the British came to India the language has had an impact on several fields—in education, literary effort and as a medium of communication.

Indian English Literature refers to that body of work by writers from India, who writes in the English language and whose native or co-native language could be one of the numerous regional and indigenous languages of India. English literature in India is also linked with the works of writers of the Indian diaspora born in India but residing elsewhere.

A pioneer of this literature was Raja Rammohan Roy whose prose works is noteworthy. There were poets who are considered the first of the Indian English poets: Henry Vivian Derozio, Madhusudan Dutt, Aru and Toru Dutt, and Manmohan Ghose. Indian literature in English actually dates back to the 1830s to Kashiprasad Ghosh, who is considered the first Indian poet write in English.

Sochee Chunder Dutt was the first writer of fiction. In the beginning, however, political writing in the novel or essay format was dominant, as can be seen in Raja Rammohan Roy’ works. An outstanding Indo-Anglian writer was Aurobindo Ghose whose poetic magnum opus is Savitri an epic. In prose his most effective work is The Life Divine outlining his metaphysics in a rich language.

Some of Rabindranath Tagore’s works were originally written in English Sadhana Personality and The Religion of Man Yet another Indian writer in English was Sarojini Naidu, the Nightingale of India’, who rendered familiar things with an essence of colour and romance. The Golden Threshold, The Bird of Time and The Broken Wing are her important works. Jawaharlal Nehru’s prose works, The Discovery of India and Glimpses of World History, are famous.

In the genre of novel, three early writers made a mark. Mulik Raj Anand’s Coolie, Untouchable, The Big Heart and other novels are about the underprivileged in India. R.K. Narayan has become famous for creating the imaginary ‘Malgudi’ as the locale for most of his novels. He has a humorous manner and an eye for the comic in the world around him. His works include Swami and his Friends.

The Dark Room, the Guide, Waiting for the Mahatma and The Man Eater of Malgudi Raja Rao is a good short story writer and has written only four novels but they are significant. They include Kanthapura, The Serpent and the Rope, and The Cat and Shakespeare. Besides the legendary and hugely venerated Indian English literary personalities like Rabindranath Tagore or R K Narayan, later novelists like Kamala Markandaya (Nectar in a Sieve, Some Inner Fury A Silence of Desire, Two Virgins), Manohar Malgaonkar (Distant

Drum, Combat of Shadows, The Princes, A Bend in the Ganges and The Devil’s Wind), Anita Desai (Clear Light of Day, The Accompanist, Fire on the Mountain, Games at Twilight) and Nayantara Sehgal, have ceaselessly captured the spirit of an independent India struggling to break away from the British and establish a distinct identity. Khushwant Singh (Train to Pakistan), Bhabani Bhattacharya (So Many Hungers, He Who Rides Tiger, Music for Mohini) are other Indian novelists famous for their writing in English.

In the recent past, we have had a crop of fresh talent. During the 1980s and 1990s, India had emerged as a major literary nation. Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children had become a rage around the world, winning the Booker Prize. Other Indian English literature novelists of repute of the contemporary times include V.S. Naipaul, Shobha De (Selective Memory), G.V. Desani, M. Ananthanarayanan, Arun Joshi, O.V. Vijayan, Allan Sealy (The Trotternama), Shashi Tharoor (Show Business, The Great Indian Novel) and Amitav Ghosh (Circle of Reason, Shadow Lines). Vikram Seth wrote a novel in verse. The Suitable Boy, which is equally famous for the stupendous advance he got from his publishers. Upamanyu Chatterjee (English August) has made a name for himself as a foremost modern novelist.

Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things won the 1997 Booker Prize and became an international best-seller overnight. Rohinton Mistry, Firdaus Kanga, Kiran Desai (Strange Happenings in the Guava Orchard), Sudhir Kakar (The Ascetic of Desire), Ardeshir Vakil (Beach Boy) and Jhumpa Lahiri (Interpreter of Maladies) are some other renowned writers of Indian origin. Satish Gujral’s A Brush with Life, R.K. Laxman’s The Tunnel of Time, Prof. Bipin Chandra’s India after Independence, Sunil Khilnani’s The Idea of India, J.N. Dixit’s Fifty Years of India’s Foreign Policy, Yogesh Chadha’s Rediscovering Gandhi and Pavan K.Varma’s The Great Indian Middle Class, are also some notable works of recent times.

The mid-20th century Indian literature in English had witnessed the emergence of poets such as Nissim Ezekiel (The Unfurnished Man), P. Lai, A.K. Ramanujan (The Striders, Relations, Second Sight, Selected Poems), Dom Moraes (A Beginning), Keki N. Daruwalla and Geive Patel.

These authors make use of Indian phrases alongside English words and have tried to reproduce a blend of the Indian and the Western cultures. While Indian poets, novelists, essayists, dramatists have been making momentous and considerable contributions to world literature since the pre-Independence era, the past few years have witnessed a thriving of Indian English writing in the global market. The works of Indian authors writing in English are often to be found on the best-seller list. They are also incurring and earning an immense amount of critical fame.

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A VISIT TO CAMBRIDGE

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A VISIT TO CAMBRIDGE

BY:- FIRDAUS KANGA

PRESENTED BY:- KAVITA T.G.T (ENG)

This is the story of a meeting between two Extraordinary people, both of

them “differently abled”.

The Greatest scientist

& Firdaus Kanga

a writer and journalist.

The most brilliant

ParalysedastrophysIcist, Stephen hawking.

Is confined to a wheelchair and speak only

by punching buttons on a computer.

A visit to cambridge

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A visit to cambridge

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