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Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario

Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario

Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario

Infobox_University
name = Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario
motto =
established = 2005 Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "About us". Retrieved July 1, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=1 ]
president = James Downey CNW Telbec (2007, January 4). "James Downey appointed first president of Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario". Retrieved July 1, 2008, from http://www.cnw.ca/fr/releases/archive/January2007/04/c3135.html ]
city = flagicon|Canada Toronto
state = Ontario
country = Canada
affiliations =
address = 1 Yonge Street, Suite 2402, Toronto, Ontario M5E 1E5
phone =
website = http://www.heqco.ca/

The Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario is an independent advisory agency funded by the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities (TCU) to provide recommendations for improving quality, accessibility, inter-institutional transfer, system planning, and effectiveness in higher education in Ontario. In 2005, the provincial government established the Council through the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario Act Cite web
url=http://www.canlii.org/on/laws/regu/2006r.336/20061024/whole.html
title=HIGHER EDUCATION QUALITY COUNCIL OF ONTARIO, O. Reg. 336/06
publisher=Queen's Printer for Ontario
date=2005
accessdate=2008-07-02
] and appointed Frank Iacobucci as its Chair. Cite web
url=http://www.thestar.com/article/240008
title=Studying the Ivory Tower
last=Brown
first=Louise
publisher= Toronto Star
date= 2007-07-26
accessdate=2008-07-02
]

In 2005, Bob Rae released a comprehensive review of postsecondary education entitled "Ontario: A leader in learning" or more commonly known as the Rae Report or Rae Review. The report included a recommendation to change the structure of higher education in Ontario by adding an independent and objective "Council on Higher Education" to monitor the dynamic changes of post-secondary institutions in order to provide advice to government on the overall system. Cite web
url=http://www.usask.ca/communications/ocn/05-feb-18/news12.shtml
title=THE RAE REPORT
publisher= University of Saskatchewan. On Campus News
date= 2005-02-18
accessdate=2008-07-06
] [Skolnik, M. L. (2005). The Rae Review and the structure of postsecondary education in Ontario. In C. M. Beach (Ed.), "A challenge for higher education in Ontario" (pp. 21 - 22). Kingston, ON: John Deutsch Institute for the Study of Economic Policy. ] The provincial government acted on this recommendation and created an independent advisory agency to provide assessment and advice to improve higher education in Ontario. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "2006/07 Annual Report". Retrieved July 1, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/assets/HEQCO%20Annual%20Report%202006-07%20EN.pdf, p. 1. ] In 2005, the provincial government established the Council through the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario Act as part of the provincial government's "Reaching Higher" six-year plan for higher education. Cite web
url=http://www.uwo.ca/univsec/strategic_plan/report/12.htm
title=Public Investment and Accountability
work=Engaging the Future: Draft Report of the Task Force on Strategic Planning
publisher= University of Western Ontario
date= 2006-06-22
accessdate=2008-07-06
] [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "2007 Review and Research Plan". Retrieved July 1, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/pdf/101_EN.pdf, p. 4. ] In January 2007, the Council announced the appointment of James Downey as its first president. During its first year of operation ending in March 2007, the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities approved a budget of $1.1 million for operations and $700,000 for purchasing initial assets. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "2006/07 Annual Report". Retrieved July 1, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/assets/HEQCO%20Annual%20Report%202006-07%20EN.pdf, p. 16. ] In July 2007, Dr. Downey predicted that the annual budget would grow to $8 million per year sometime during 2008. [Brown, Louise (2007, July 26). New council to examine the quality, accessibility of the province's colleges, universities. "Toronto Star". Retrieved July 1, 2008, from http://www.thestar.com/article/240008 ]

By August 2007, the Council sponsored and published three research publications. Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "Publications". Retrieved July 1, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=2 ] In August 2006, the Council delivered a paper to gather input on priorities and research themes. Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "Priorities and Research Agenda for the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario". Retrieved July 1, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=116 ] In July 2007, the Council distributed the "2007 Review and Research Plan". In August 2007, the Council released a report on "Education Decisions of Canadian Youth" that summarized published research on access to higher education in Canada. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "Education Decisions of Canadian Youth". Retrieved July 1, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=111 ] The Council outlines research interests and accepts bids for projects through its Request for Proposal (RFP) process. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "Request for proposals". Retrieved July 2, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=8 ]

By May 2008, the Council hosted five events to support its mandate. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "Events". Retrieved July 2, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=113 ] In April 2007, the Council held its inaugural workshop focussing on learning quality and accountability by discussing the National Survey of Student Engagement. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "National Survey of Student Engagement Workshop". Retrieved July 2, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=114 ] In October 2007, the Council facilitated a workshop with delegates from Ontario's twenty-four Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology (CAATS) on the themes of learning quality and measurement. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "HEQCO/College Dialogue on Learning Research". Retrieved July 2, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=122 ] In November 2007, the Council held a joint workshop with the Council of Ontario Universities (COU) to compare and discuss performance indicators tracked by the universities with the objective of gathering advice on their use in the operating agreements between the ministry (i.e. TCU) and the universities. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "Performance Indicators Workshop for Universities". Retrieved July 2, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=125 ] In March 2008, the Council hosted a lecture by John Randall at which he presented observations on the evolution of quality assurance in higher education systems globally based on his experience as the head of the UK's Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "Council hosts lecture by international quality assurance expert". Retrieved July 2, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=128 ] In May 2008, the Council hosted a lecture by Walter Sudmant where he shared his insights on accountability for colleges and universities from his role as director of planning and institutional research at the University of British Columbia. [Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (n.d.). "British Columbia’s Experience with Performance Indicators in Postsecondary Education". Retrieved July 2, 2008, from http://www.heqco.ca/inside.php?&ID=131 ]

* Iacobucci, F. & Tuohy, C. (2005), "Taking public universities seriously". Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010 .

Other articles

Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario: Wikis (The Full Wiki)

Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario: Wikis

"The goal of the Council is to enhance all aspects of postsecondary education including quality, access and accountability." [ 1 ]

The Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario is an independent advisory agency funded by the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities (TCU) to provide recommendations for improving quality, accessibility, inter-institutional transfer, system planning, and effectiveness in higher education in Ontario. [ 1 ] In 2005, the provincial government established the Council through the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario Act [ 3 ] and appointed Frank Iacobucci as its Chair. [ 4 ]

Contents Background

In 2005, Bob Rae released a comprehensive review of postsecondary education entitled Ontario: A leader in learning or more commonly known as the Rae Report or Rae Review. The report included a recommendation to change the structure of higher education in Ontario by adding an independent and objective Council on Higher Education to monitor the dynamic changes of post-secondary institutions in order to provide advice to government on the overall system. [ 5 ] [ 6 ] The provincial government acted on this recommendation and created an independent advisory agency to provide assessment and advice to improve higher education in Ontario. [ 7 ] In 2005, the provincial government established the Council through the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario Act as part of the provincial government's Reaching Higher six-year plan for higher education. [ 8 ] [ 9 ] In January 2007, the Council announced the appointment of James Downey as its first president. [ 2 ] During its first year of operation ending in March 2007, the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities approved a budget of $1.1 million for operations and $700,000 for purchasing initial assets. [ 10 ] In July 2007, Dr. Downey predicted that the annual budget would grow to $8 million per year sometime during 2008. [ 11 ]

Research

By August 2007, the Council sponsored and published three research publications. [ 12 ] In August 2006, the Council delivered a paper to gather input on priorities and research themes. [ 13 ] In July 2007, the Council distributed the 2007 Review and Research Plan. In August 2007, the Council released a report on Education Decisions of Canadian Youth that summarized published research on access to higher education in Canada. [ 14 ] The Council outlines research interests and accepts bids for projects through its Request for Proposal (RFP) process. [ 15 ]

Hosted events

By May 2008, the Council hosted five events to support its mandate. [ 16 ] In April 2007, the Council held its inaugural workshop focussing on learning quality and accountability by discussing the National Survey of Student Engagement. [ 17 ] In October 2007, the Council facilitated a workshop with delegates from Ontario's twenty-four Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology (CAATS) on the themes of learning quality and measurement. [ 18 ] In November 2007, the Council held a joint workshop with the Council of Ontario Universities (COU) to compare and discuss performance indicators tracked by the universities with the objective of gathering advice on their use in the operating agreements between the ministry (i.e. TCU) and the universities. [ 19 ] In March 2008, the Council hosted a lecture by John Randall at which he presented observations on the evolution of quality assurance in higher education systems globally based on his experience as the head of the UK's Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. [ 20 ] In May 2008, the Council hosted a lecture by Walter Sudmant where he shared his insights on accountability for colleges and universities from his role as director of planning and institutional research at the University of British Columbia. [ 21 ]

References Further reading
  • Iacobucci, F. & Tuohy, C. (2005), Taking public universities seriously. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.

In the March 2006 Ontario Budget, the province announced the impending appointment of a HigherEducationQualityCouncil of Ontario (HEQCO), to monitor quality in postsecondary education This fourth accountability mechanism offers the potential for appropriate, standardized, and reliable measurement of significant areas of institutional performance.

The Provincial government, in its May 2005 budget, unveiled its Reaching Higher plan for postsecondary education following the review and recommendations of the Hon.

OntarioCouncil of Academic Vice-Presidents undergraduate and graduate degree expectations.

http://www.canlii.org/on/laws/regu/2006r.336/20061024/whole.html ">HIGHER EDUCATION QUALITY COUNCIL OF ONTARIO, O. Reg. 336/06 - CanLII - Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario, O. Reg. 336/06

ERIC - Degrees of Alienation: This Paper Is Definitely Not a HEQCO Funded Policy Report, College Quarterly, 2011

College Quarterly. v14 n4 Fall 2011

Walter Benn Michaels has argued that higher education policies have been fashioned through a diversity fetish, rather than grappling with class inequities produced through neoliberal restructuring. When the author was asked the question of whether Benn Michael's analysis pertained to Canadian higher education, she found herself writing the present article within which she argues that pitting class against race is a liberalizing strategy that obfuscates how each ruling relation is interlocking and mutually constitutive. She then goes on to show how such interlocking dynamics productive of racialized and gendered class relations currently function within the Ontario postsecondary system through the production of "tieredness", otherwise termed "system differentiation" in policy papers published by the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO). Because the paper grew out of her response to Benn Michael's analysis, the author will summarize her take on his book, "How to Love Identity and Ignore Inequality," in order to illustrate certain dynamics affecting equity politics within the Canadian, and in particular, the Ontario higher education landscape. These dynamics do not concern the college sector unto itself, nor the university sector unto itself, but rather spans the entirety of the system. (Contains 3 endnotes.)

Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology. 1750 Finch Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario M2J 2X5, Canada. Tel: 416-491-5050; Fax: 905-479-4561; Web site: http://www.collegequarterly.ca

HEQCO performance indicators - WLUFA

HEQCO performance indicators

In a paper released today. the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) reviews the performance of Ontario’s postsecondary education system in terms of access, quality, productivity, and social impact. It confirms what Ontario’s professors and academic librarians have known for years – our universities are efficient, productive, and accessible (though more work is needed to ensure participation for under-represented groups, such as Aboriginal and first-generation students). Unfortunately, the paper also furthersHEQCO’s tunnel-vision approach to narrow outcomes-based accountability regimes.

HEQCO argues that promoting quality is the “next frontier” in higher education. OCUFA certainly agrees that quality must be a focus of the provincial government going forward – we have been arguing for quality enhancements for the past two decades. However, HEQCO’s conception of “quality” is confined to poorly defined outcome measures. While outcomes – attainment rates, employment, and research output – are important, they are only one part of the quality picture. To really understand what is happening in Ontario’s universities, we must also consider inputs (such as public funding) and processes (such as student-faculty ratios and student engagement). Outcomes are useless unless we understand the resources and approaches that created them. Otherwise, continuous improvement is impossible.

The paper also continues HEQCO’s narrow focus on labour market outcomes. While the employability and labour market success of graduates is extremely important, job training is only one of the many important individual and social functions of the university. Followed to its logical conclusion, over-focusing on job training will distort our institutions and diminish their ability to educate and engage with students and their community.

This paper reflects HEQCO’s disappointing belief that improvements to quality must somehow be made in the absence of new government funding. This is problematic for three reasons: it ignores the transformative role that public investment has played in creating the current system; it posits fiscal constraint as an immutable fact, rather than the result of political choices; and it provides a convenient excuse for the provincial government to ignore the urgent financial needs of the sector by offering false-hope alternatives. OCUFA will continue to argue that the only way to ensure quality and accessibility is sustained and robust public investment. Anything else is just fiddling at the margins.

If you have any questions about this paper or HEQCO in general, please do not hesitate to get in touch. The paper can be downloaded at: http://heqco.ca/SiteCollectionDocuments/Performance_Indicators_ENG.PDF

Best Regards,
Graeme

Graeme Stewart
Communications Manager
Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations
300-83 Yonge St. | Toronto, ON | M5C 1S8
416 979 2117 x232 | gstewart@ocufa.on.ca
www.ocufa.on.ca | @OCUFA | www.facebook.com/OCUFA

Created on: Thursday, April 18th, 2013

Last updated on: Tuesday, May 20th, 2014

UW Daily Bulletin, February 17, 2009

  • Editor:
  • Chris Redmond
  • Communications and Public Affairs
  • bulletin@uwaterloo.ca

The one wearing pants is former prime minister Paul Martin, who visited the university Friday. met with officials and gave a public talk in the Student Life Centre. He was inveigled into posing with members of the No Pants Group, associated with the Computer Science Club and the Computational Math Club. "The present tradition," says Holden Karau (at right in photo), "is not to wear pants on Friday (although the majority of people wear pants to school and remove their pants there since it is still cold)." Demonstrating the necessary sang-froid with him are, left to right, Qifan Xi, Jake Parker, and Joel Merk.

Proposal for Ontario 'open university'

from news releases issued by the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario

HEQCO has released a new research paper, Degrees of Opportunity: Broadening Student Access by Increasing Institutional Differentiation in Ontario Higher Education. Prepared by higher education scholars Glen Jones and Michael Skolnik, this paper was commissioned to determine whether there are significant gaps in Ontario’s postsecondary education system with respect to education and research activities and, if so, how these gaps might be addressed.

“Examining the design of Ontario’s postsecondary system is a key component of HEQCO’s mandate,” said Dr. Ken Norrie, vice-president of research for the Council. “Ontario’s higher education sector faces several significant issues, including growing enrolment demand, particularly in the Greater Toronto Area, and the need to provide educational opportunities that respond to the province’s economic needs. Degrees of Opportunity is an initial attempt to tackle these challenges by examining the current design of the postsecondary system.”

Jones and Skolnik conclude that Ontario’s higher education system could benefit from several new types of postsecondary structures, including teaching-oriented institutions that focus on undergraduate education; collaborative programs; an “open university” that enables learners to combine credits from different institutions and learning experiences; and greater pathways for college students to attain a bachelor’s degree and continue on to graduate study.

“In today’s economy, we can’t rest on our laurels. Our research is aimed at ensuring we know how our system of higher education is working and what needs to be done to keep it working well,” said Norrie. “Our review of the system will look at the full range of opportunities that Ontarians need in order to be competitive in the knowledge economy.”

This paper is the first of a series of research projects and stakeholder consultations that HEQCO plans before developing its advice to the minister on system planning issues. HEQCO is an arm’s-length agency of the Government of Ontario, mandated to conduct research, evaluate the postsecondary education system, and provide policy recommendations to the minister of training, colleges and universities with a view to enhance the quality, access, and accountability of Ontario’s higher education system. President of the council is James Downey, who was president of UW 1993 to 1999.

Earlier last week, the council released its Second Annual Review and Research Plan. This document highlights the Council's research findings over the past year and lays out a comprehensive plan for continuing its research into improving postsecondary education in Ontario.

"Times of economic uncertainty are fertile opportunities for change," said Frank Iacobucci, chair of the Council. "We must ensure that our colleges and universities are able to play their part in ensuring Ontario prospers in the new knowledge economy. With the Second Annual Review and Research Plan, HEQCO has laid out a research program that will help policymakers meet short-term needs while striving towards this long-term goal."

"The Second Annual Research and Review Plan," said Downey, "is issued at a time of considerable uncertainty and challenge for our colleges and universities, including a deepening recession, expected large increases in enrolment (especially in the GTA), and the need for expanded educational pathways. Such challenges necessitate a sound understanding of the system we have in relation to the system we will need in the years ahead. Our report broadens and deepens that understanding."

Announcements that need to be tolled

UW’s north campus is providing a temporary home for the "Waterloo Bell" sculpture that the City of Waterloo has commissioned, until space is ready in the planned new downtown square. The artist, Royden Rabinowitch (left), has completed the manufacturing process for “The Waterloo Bell — Bell for Kepler”. This artwork commission is to be installed at the intended site facing on King Street when the construction on the square is completed this spring. Says Carol Stewart, business manager for UW’s research and technology park: “The artwork is a fitting icon in Waterloo, since so much of our history is founded on the tension between science and faith. Thematically, we believe that a temporary location for the Bell at the Institute for Quantum Computing (RAC building in the Park) is a good fit — to continue to build the understanding and appreciation for the artwork in our community before it is installed in its permanent home.”

Results of the recent undergraduate student election were to be announced Friday, but, well. “The Federation of Students regrets to announce that the results of the 2009 Federation of Students’ Executive, Students’ Council and University of Waterloo undergraduate student Senate elections will be delayed,” said John Andersen, the Chief Electoral Officer. “Of the 23,000 full-time undergraduate students eligible to vote, approximately 200 found they were unable to cast their ballots using the Federation of Students’ online ballot web page. These students are registered in the Software Engineering and in the Computing and Financial Management programs and are currently away on a coop term. After voting began, it became apparent that there was an error in the voters list. After investigating, I discovered I made an error when requesting the list from the University regarding these constituencies. As a result of the error, the Election Committee has decided to hold an additional polling period for these students. Since these students could affect the results of the elections, the Election Committee will defer tabulating final results until the remaining students are given their opportunity to participate in voting, and all votes have been counted. Final results are expected after students return from the Reading Week break.”

The DaCapo Chamber Choir, based at Conrad Grebel University College, is “thrilled” by this week’s news, a memo says: “The piece Notes Towards a Poem That Can Never Be Written by local composer (and former DaCapo singer) Timothy Corlis has been nominated for a Juno, in the category Classical Composition of the Year. The DaCapo Chamber Choir commissioned this piece (with funding from the Ontario Arts Council) and premiered it in March 2006. It is also the central piece on the Notes Toward recording, which is available online at CD Baby and will be on sale at DaCapo’s March 7 concert. This recording of the nominated composition features the DaCapo Chamber Choir, cellist Ben Bolt-Martin, narrator Bruce Dow, and soprano soloist Sheila Dietrich. It was recorded under the Chestnut Hall label. The Junos will be awarded on March 29 and will air on CTV.”

It’s definite now: Saturday, December 5, will be a Monday this year. UW will hold classes on that one Saturday to round off the fall term with the minimum acceptable number of teaching days, the university senate decided at its January meeting. Registrar Ken Lavigne had recommended the unusual arrangement because Labour Day falls as late this year as it ever can, on September 7. The last time the beginning-of-term holiday fell on the 7th was in 1998, but since then, the rules about the number of study days students must enjoy have been tightened — also by senate action. Shortening the term isn’t possible because accreditation for some of UW’s academic programs, as well as longstanding senate rules, require a minimum of 60 class days. Lavigne and his staff worked out various “scenarios” for the term, he said, and some of them included major changes to orientation week, which traditionally starts on Labour Day. “We didn’t want to force a change to orientation without proper analysis.” he says. So classes will begin Monday, September 14, and wind up on December 5, which will be treated as a Monday for scheduling purposes. Says Lavigne: “I am not the only one who faced the challenge presented by a late Labour Day. School boards are having to start the school year before Labour Day to achieve the required number of teaching days.”

And. the university secretariat sends word that online voting starts today to fill the regular staff seats on the Dean of Applied Health Sciences and Dean of Mathematics nominating committees. The candidates contesting the positions follow: Applied Health Sciences — Pete Driezen (Population Health Research Group), Meredith McGinnis (Dean's Office); Mathematics Lis D'Alessio (Pure Mathematics), Sherryl DiCiccio (Computer Science).

Link of the day

Heqco research paper

Wages and Full-time Employment Rates of Young High School Graduates and Bachelor's Degree Holders, 1997 to 2012 References

Baggs, J. E. Beaulieu, and L. Fung. 2009. "Firm Survival, Performance, and the Exchange Rate." Canadian Journal of Economics 42 (2): 393–421.

Bowlby, G. and S. Langlois. 2002. "High-tech boom and bust." Perspectives on Labour and Income April 2002: 12–18. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 75-001-X.

Bourdabat, B. T. Lemieux, and W.C. Riddell. 2010. "The Evolution of the Returns to Human Capital in Canada, 1980-2005." Canadian Public Policy 36 (1): 63–88.

Card, D. 2001. "Estimating the Return to Schooling: Progress on Some Persistent Econometric Problems." Econometrica 69: 1127–1160.

Frenette, M. 2007. Life After the High-tech Meltdown: Permanent Layoffs and Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers. Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series, no. 302. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 11F0019M. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

Frenette M. and J. Robson. 2011. Financial Literary of Low-income Students: Literature Review and Environmental Scan. Toronto, Ontario: Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario.

Galarneau, D. 2005. "Earnings of Temporary versus Permanent Employees." Perspectives on Labour and Income January 2005: 5–18. Statistics Canada catalogue no. 75-001-X.

Lemieux, T. 1998. "Estimating the Effects of Unions on Wage Inequality in a Panel Data Model with Comparative Advantage and Nonrandom Selection." Journal of Labor Economics 16 (2, April 1998): 261–291.

Mishel, L. J. Bivens, E. Gould, and H. Shierholz. 2012. The State of Working America: 12 th Edition. Ithaca, New York: Economic Policy Institute, Cornell University Press.

Morissette, R. G. Picot, and Y. Lu. 2013. The Evolution of Canadian Wages Over the Last Three Decades. Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series, no. 347. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 11F0019M. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

Oaxaca, R.L. 1973. "Male–Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets." International Economic Review 14 (3): 693–709.

Oaxaca, R.L. and M.R. Ransom. 1994. "On Discrimination and the Decomposition of Wage Differentials." Journal of Econometrics 61 (1): 5–21.

Solon, G. S.J. Haider, and J. Wooldridge. 2013. What Are We Weighting For? NBER Working Paper Series, no. 18859. Cambridge, Massachusetts: National Bureau of Economic Research.

Date modified: 2015-11-27

Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario

HEQCO explores key issues in higher education

Created through the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario Act, 2005, HEQCO is an arm’s-length agency of the Government of Ontario that brings evidence-based research to the continued improvement of the postsecondary education system in Ontario. As part of its mandate, HEQCO evaluates the postsecondary sector and provides policy recommendations to the Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities to enhance the access, quality and accountability of Ontario’s colleges and universities. Among the questions HEQCO explores:

  • Are students satisfied with their postsecondary experience?
  • Do they acquire the knowledge and skills that prepare them for their personal and professional lives?
  • What are the barriers to pursuing PSE, barriers to staying in school, barriers to graduating?
  • How are under-represented groups faring in accessing and completing PSE and what strategies will improve their participation?
  • What are the attributes of a responsive and efficient PSE system, and how can the system and its institutions be more accountable to the public and government for the use of public dollars?

HEQCO informs solutions

  • Conducts and commissions studies and evaluations, often in partnership with Ontario’s colleges and universities, on key issues in accessibility, quality and accountability.
  • Produces At Issue reports that synthesize the most current data and research – providing postsecondary decision-makers and the general public with critical insight and information on emerging trends in postsecondary education.
  • Evaluates the postsecondary sector and makes that evaluation available to the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, and the general public.

The authority to create the Council is established in the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario Act, 2005 .

The Council is chaired by Elizabeth Dowdeswell, president and CEO of the Council of Canadian Academies. Council members are appointed for two or three year terms through a Lieutenant Governor of Ontario Order-in-Council.

The Council reports to the Ontario Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities and must prepare an annual report . which it submits to the Minister for tabling in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

HEQCO is a vital part of the dialogue on postsecondary education.

KMb for HEQCO 121017

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KMb for HEQCO 121017

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