Homework Tips For Parents From Teachers - Homework for you

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Homework Tips For Parents From Teachers

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Homework Tips on Math: What Teachers Can Tell Parents

Homework Tips on Reading: What Teachers Can Tell Parents

Charlie is like many of the students I work with in my study skills classes; he found great success from applying these best homework tips strategies to the process of learning and doing homework!

Conclusion About The Best Homework Tips

Top 10 Homework Tips - KidsHealth

Let’s talk about homework. The struggle to get your kids excited about homework is very real. Today, on the blog, iFamilyKC Mom Squad blogger Leah is sharing some helpful advice for encouraging your kids to do their homework. Take a look at Leah’s helpful homework tips…

Homework Tips for Parents - U.S. Department of Education

This is best tips for students, keep blogging, many students are like this post, and this post provide some useful homework tips, nowadays students are using to get homework assistance


The homework tips presented on this page are targeted at the three key people who are most directly involved--you, as the teacher, the kids in your classes, and the parents who must deal with them at home.1. Get organized! “I didn’t realize how much time I wasted looking for things,” explained Charlie. “My notes, homework assignments, folders, textbooks…I spent so much time digging through my book bag for things. Many times, I had to ask my dad to drive me back to school because I forgot stuff in my locker. He was never happy with that, it took a lot of time and he always wondered whether I'd ever learn the best homework tips."Homework is assigned to help students practice and enhance the concepts and skills learned inside the classroom. Parents can help children develop study skills that result in homework success and better understanding of school topics. Parent’s involvement when done the right way can have positive impacts on children’s learning experience and speed up their learning process. Here are some useful homework tips for parents to help children complete their homework assignments effectively and in a learning-friendly environment. To help Charlie get organized, we condensed his 14 different folders and notebooks down to ONE binder. It was instantly easier for him to track papers, assignments, and notes because everything went in one place. This also reduced the volume of his supplies by 60%, which instantly resulted in a more organized book bag and locker. Just doing this one simple thing helped him know he was on his way to learning the best homework tips.

Homework Tips for Parents -- TOC - U.S

Today I’m joining with other bloggers to help you make this the best school year ever. I’m going to help you with one area that your family may have struggled with in the past- READING HOMEWORK! Here are my reading homework tips for a stress-free school year.

Homework Tips for Parents (Elementary School)

I asked Charlie to share the best homework tips and top three study skills that made the most difference for him. This is what he shared several months later:

Homework Tips that Really Work for Teachers, Parents, and Students

Study skills –which are really strategic learning skills- are not taught in schools. The national and state standards that teachers have to teach are ALL content. There is absolutely no focus on teaching students how to learn. Charlie was floundering because he had no system for success. Once he learned a system of good study skills plus the best homework tips, however, he was unstoppable!

Homework Tips From a <> Teacher

Talk to your child’s teacher and pediatrician right away. Keep notes on your observations and stick to your guns! If there is a learning challenge, you may be met with some resistance along the way, but your persistence and friendly cooperation with teachers and doctors will be the key to getting proper help for your child. Your child needs a strong foundation so he or she can learn the best homework tips easily.

Homework Tips For Kids Teens by MarvinGolden

If that is the case, determine the root of the problem; is it your child or the homework? If your child is struggling to complete homework within the “ten minute” guideline, he may simply need to get organized and learn a few strategic study skills plus the best homework tips like Charlie did.

Other articles

PPT - A Teacher s Guide to Homework Tips for Parents U

A Teacher's Guide to Homework Tips for Parents U. S. Department of Education - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript and Presenter's Notes


Title: A Teacher's Guide to Homework Tips for Parents U. S. Department of Education


1
A Teacher's Guide to Homework Tips for
ParentsU. S. Department of Education
2
A Teacher's Guide to Homework Tips for Parents
  • This information was developed by the U.S.
    Department of Education to assist parents,
    caregivers and teachers in understanding the
    importance of homework and the role that parental
    involvement plays in assigning homework.

3
True or False?
  • Homework should only be given to students in
    grades four and above.
  • Assigned homework should focus only on one aspect
    of learning.

4
True or False?
  • If a child is having trouble with his or her
    homework, parents should reach out to the teacher
    or school for help.
  • All homework will have a positive impact on
    students in the long run.

5
What Teachers Can Tell Parents About Homework
  • Make sure your child has a quiet, well-lit place
    to do homework.
  • Make sure the materials your child needssuch as
    paper, pencils and a dictionaryare available.
  • Help your child with time management.
  • Be positive about homework.

6
What Teachers Can Tell Parents About Homework
  • When your child does homework, you do homework,
    such as balancing a checkbook.
  • When your child asks for help, provide guidance,
    not answers.
  • When the teacher asks that you play a role in
    homework, do it.
  • If homework is meant to be done by your child
    alone, stay away.

7
What Teachers Can Tell Parents About Homework
  • Stay informed about your childs school
    assignments.
  • Help your child figure out what is hard homework
    and what is easy homework.
  • Watch your child for signs of failure or
    frustration.
  • Reward progress in homework.

8
Homework Tips on ReadingWhat Teachers Can Tell
Parents
  • Have your child read aloud to you every night.
  • Choose a quiet place, free from distractions, for
    your child to do his nightly reading assignments.
  • As your child reads, point out spelling and sound
    patterns such as cat, pat, hat.

9
Homework Tips on Reading What Teachers Can
Tell Parents
  • When your child reads aloud to you and makes a
    mistake, point out words she has missed and help
    her to read the word correctly.
  • After your child has stopped to correct a word he
    has read, have him go back and reread the entire
    sentence from the beginning to make sure he
    understands what the sentence is saying.

10
Homework Tips on ReadingWhat Teachers Can Tell
Parents
  • Ask your child to tell you in her own words what
    happened in a story.
  • To check your childs understanding of what he is
    reading, occasionally pause and ask your child
    questions about the characters and events in the
    story.

11
Homework Tips on Reading What Teachers Can
Tell Parents
  • Ask your child why she thinks a character acted
    in a certain way and ask your child to support
    her answer with information from the story.
  • Before getting to the end of a story, ask your
    child what he thinks will happen next and why.

12
Homework Tips on MathWhat Teachers Can Tell
Parents
  • Encourage your child to use a daily math
    assignment book.
  • Check with your child daily about his homework.
  • If your child is experiencing problems in math,
    contact the teacher.

13
Homework Tips on Math What Teachers Can Tell
Parents
  • Encourage the principal to use research-based
    peer tutoring programs for math.
  • Try to be aware of how your child is being taught
    math, and dont teach strategies and shortcuts
    that conflict with the approach the teacher is
    using.

14
Homework Tips on MathWhat Teachers Can Tell
Parents
  • Engage in frequent communication with your
    childs teacher.
  • Request that your childs teacher schedule
    after-school math tutoring sessions if your child
    really needs help.

15
Homework Tips on Math What Teachers Can Tell
Parents
  • Check in with the teacher and ask what you can do
    to help.
  • Ask the teacher about online resources that you
    can use with your child at home.

16
Homework Tips on Math What Teachers Can Tell
Parents
  • Use household chores as opportunities for
    reinforcing math learning such as cooking and
    repair activities.

17
Resource Information
  • Call 1-800-USA-LEARN or visit
    www.NoChildLeftBehind.gov

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presentations for free. Or use it to find and download high-quality how-to PowerPoint ppt presentations with illustrated or animated slides that will teach you how to do something new, also for free. Or use it to upload your own PowerPoint slides so you can share them with your teachers, class, students, bosses, employees, customers, potential investors or the world. Or use it to create really cool photo slideshows - with 2D and 3D transitions, animation, and your choice of music - that you can share with your Facebook friends or Google+ circles. That's all free as well!

For a small fee you can get the industry's best online privacy or publicly promote your presentations and slide shows with top rankings. But aside from that it's free. We'll even convert your presentations and slide shows into the universal Flash format with all their original multimedia glory, including animation, 2D and 3D transition effects, embedded music or other audio, or even video embedded in slides. All for free. Most of the presentations and slideshows on PowerShow.com are free to view, many are even free to download. (You can choose whether to allow people to download your original PowerPoint presentations and photo slideshows for a fee or free or not at all.) Check out PowerShow.com today - for FREE. There is truly something for everyone!

Teacher Tips For Homework

Teacher Tips For Homework

In my latest installment of "Teacher, Teacher!" for CHEX Daily, I chatted with hosts Teresa Kaszuba (who came up with the new name for my segments) and Mike Judson about the huge topic of homework.
There are many different theories out there now about homework (pro and con), from educational experts, teachers and parents, but the reality is that many kids are coming home with work to do in the evenings, and it can be a struggle for parents. How much should you help? Is it okay if they are "breaking the rules" by doing their homework at different times each day, listening to music, or in the busy kitchen?
I could have taken up their whole hour talking about this, so I feel like I barely scratched the surface, but here's what I had to say:
(I'm at the 32:05 mark if it doesn't cue where I've set it, and if you can't see the embedded video, you can find it at http://youtu.be/nXmZc0aAh54?t=32m5s )

I'm not sure if I emphasized enough (since I don't watch myself after the fact) how parents should do what works best for their family. Sure, kids thrive on routine and it would be wonderful if they could do their homework at the exact same time each night, but I see in my own class that some kids are going home on the bus twice a week but to daycare the other three days, most are involved in extracurriculars at least once a week, and some are back and forth between mom's and dad's. so don't beat yourself up over it. If the kids are getting the homework done, to the best of their ability, the logistics don't really matter. (My older daughter prefers to work kneeling at the coffee table. and sometimes the TV is even on!)
Some kids certainly struggle with focus, and for them it's important to remove distractions (siblings, screens, etc.) as necessary.
On a personal/professional homework note, I am trying to get away from it in my classroom as much as possible.
I am teaching Grade 2/3 this year, and I decided not to assign regular nightly/weekly work (especially because it's primary - I'm not sure I would do the same in junior/intermediate). The only tasks that go home are the ones that students should have completed during class time, plus Math test review for the Grade 3's (I give them written tests for each unit, since they need to be prepared for EQAO) and occasional activities that require family input (e.g. when they need to ask their parents about the day they were born).
I send home levelled books for students to read, as I know not all homes have just-right books available for the children, but without any log or tracking required, and just ask parents to return the books when their child is ready for new ones.

My hope is that kids are spending their evenings being active, pursuing other hobbies (e.g. in the arts) and having leisure time, which hopefully includes lots of reading for pleasure. Their teacher is attempting to do the same thing with her evenings as well!
But it may surprise parents to learn that for every one who feels their child gets too much homework, there is a parent in that same class asking for more (no, really!) Some believe the more practice the better, but then others worry about their families having balance. It's a tough call, and the research isn't conclusive enough to make any sweeping generalizations. so I'm using my professional judgment and doing what I think is best right now, with the information I have.
To wrap-up with a story:
As you may (or hopefully may not) be able to tell, I was pretty sick when I shot this segment. That day at school, I mentioned to my class that I hoped I didn't lose my voice, as I was supposed to be on the news that night.
One special little guy asked, "On the 6:00 or 11:00 news?"
"Actually, it's a show that's on right before the 6:00 news," I replied.
"Oh, you mean The New CHEX Daily ?"
I thought that was pretty cute, from an 8 year old. See, if he had too much homework, he wouldn't be able to watch such quality television!

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Homework Tips for Parents

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Study the same things in different ways and places

Help your child learn about new words or content in a variety of ways. Talk about new vocabulary words several times over the course of the week, in different settings. This will help enrich your child's understanding of the word.

Mix up the study time

If your child prefers to do a little math, a little reading, a little word study and then back to math, that's okay! Mixing up the practice time may leave a greater impression on your learner.

Space out the learning

If your child has a big test coming up next week, help her study a little bit each day rather than cramming it in the night before. An hour or so every other day, spacing out the learning, is a better way to really learn the material.

Help your child get organized

Help your child pick out a special homework notebook or folder, and make sure your child has homework supplies, such as:

Show your child that you think homework is important

Ask your child about her homework each day, and check to see that it is completed. Tell your child that you are proud of the work she is doing.

Help your child without doing the homework

It's important to answer questions if you can — but remember that homework is supposed to help children learn and that doing your child's homework does not help in the long run.

Talk with your child's teacher

Find out what the teacher's homework rules are. If your child has a problem completing or understanding homework, call or e-mail the teacher to talk about the issue.

Homework Tips that Really Work for Teachers, Parents, and Students

These Homework Tips will Take the Fire out of the Homework Wars!

The homework tips presented on this page are targeted at the three key people who are most directly involved--you, as the teacher, the kids in your classes, and the parents who must deal with them at home.

As teachers, we all know that homework is good for kids for a variety of reasons that don't need to be enumerated here.

Although parents recognize the long-term benefits of homework, they aren’t any happier about the daily struggle to get it done. In the homework wars (“Sit down and do your homework now!” “Stop nagging me!”), parents often times must shoulder the responsibility of making sure that it gets done regularly and on time.

We ALL know how they feel about homework.

The mere utterance of this word causes them to grimace and writhe in disgust. They hate it. We all know that. But, we all know that it's essential to their academic success.

What follows on this page are some homework tips from Harris Cooper, a professor of psychology at Duke University who studies homework.

Additionally, I have prepared some documents based on his suggestions that may be useful to you. These documents may be downloaded free of charge.

Quick Links for THIS Page

You may use the following quick links to go directly to what interests you on this page. You may also scroll down the page manually if you choose to do so.

Tips for Teachers
Tips for Parents
Tips for Students
Sample Homework Documents
Homework Charts
  • Homework Reading Log
  • Checklist without Subjects
  • Checklist with Subjects
  • Weekly Log
  • Homework Chart
  • Two Week Homework Checklist
  • My Homework Chart
  • Daily Assignment Sheet
Free Download
Conclusion

Homework Tips for Teachers

Give the right amount of homework.

Research suggests students should get about 10 minutes of homework each night for each grade (10 minutes for 1st grade, 20 for 2nd, and so on). Adjust upward a bit if assignments are mostly reading or your students come from families with strong educational orientations.

Don’t overload kids with homework. It can ruin motivation.

Keep parents informed. Let parents know the purpose of homework and what your class rules are.

If communication is clear, homework is an important bridge between schools and families. If communication is lacking, homework creates tensions that are hard to resolve.

Vary the kinds of homework. Homework is a great way for kids to practice things that are learned by rote (spelling, math facts, foreign language).

It's also a great way to show kids the things they learn in school apply to things they enjoy at home (calculating batting averages, reading the back of a cereal box). Mix it up.

Be careful about parent involvement. Consider the time and skill resources of parents when requiring their involvement. Working parents may have little time for a direct homework role. Poorly-educated parents may have trouble being good mentors.

Students who are doing well in school may benefit most from homework they do all by themselves.

Never give homework as punishment. It implies you think schoolwork is aversive. Kids will pick up on this.

Homework Tips for Parents

1. Be a stage manager.

Make sure your child has a quiet, well-lit place to do homework. Make sure the needed materials (paper, pencils, dictionary) are available.

Unless the homework assignment involves using a computer, power down electronics and remove other unnecessary distractions.

2. Be a motivator.

Homework provides a great opportunity for you to tell your child how important school is. Be positive about homework.

The attitude you express about homework will be the attitude your child acquires.

3. Be a role model.

When your child does homework, don’t sit and watch TV. If your child is reading, you read too. If your child is doing math, balance your checkbook.

Help your child see that the skills they are practicing are related to things you do as an adult.

Watch your child for signs of failure and frustration. If your child asks for help, provide guidance, not answers. If frustration sets in, suggest a short break.

When the teacher asks that you play a role in homework, do it. If homework is meant to be done alone, stay away. Homework is a great way for kids to develop independent, life-long learning skills.

Over-involvement can be a bad thing.

Homework Tips for Students

1. Pick a good time to do homework.
homework tips
Try to do your homework at the same time everyday--right after school, just before dinner, or right after dinner. Try not to leave homework until just before you have to go to bed.

2. Find a place that makes studying easy.

Collect up all the books and supplies you’ll need (and your snack) before you begin to work. Do your homework in the same place every day.

3. Spend more time on hard homework than easy homework.

If you know what’s easy and what's hard, do the hard work first. Take a short break if you are having trouble keeping your mind on an assignment.

4. If homework gets too hard, ask for help.

If your parents are busy and you have an older brother or sister, ask them for help, or get your parents to ask them. Only ask for help if you really need it.

5. Remember to make time for long-term projects.

Think about using a weekend morning or afternoon for working on big projects, especially if the project involves getting together with classmates. If you need special stuff for a project, make sure to tell your parents to get it for you well in advance.

Sample Homework Documents

What follows in the first part of this section is a collection of PDF documents that are suitable for printing and distributing to the concerned parties.
homework tips
I have set these up in a way that will allow you to add your own customized header, if you choose to do so.
homework tips
The screenshots that you will see here give you an idea of how each document is set up. Basically, the text of these documents is identical to what you were reading above.

The second part of this section is a collection of homework charts that may be useful for you, your kids, and their parents. These documents are also in the PDF format.

Here is the screenshot for the Homework Reading Log. You WILL be able to customize the header on this one.

Here is the Checklist without Subjects.

Here is the Checklist WITH Subjects.

Here is the Weekly Log.

This is the Homework Chart.

This is the Checklist without Subjects.

Here is the, "My Homework Chart."

This is the Daily Assignment Sheet.

All of the documents represented by the screenshots above are available in one PDF package, which I am offering completely free of charge.

As always, all I ask in return is that you support my efforts by sharing an idea with your fellow teachers on the Teachers' Ideas page and/or adding a comment to one of my blog entries at The Teacher Beacon .

Take a few seconds to click on my Facebook Like button, or take a minute or two to add a brief comment about one of the Daily Teaching Tools pages that you may have found useful.

Or, how about grabbing a T-shirt or coffee cup at The TeacherMarket. He__! If you really want to go all out, purchase one of my software products !

A recent poll (August, 2013) of teachers and parents by AP/AOL Learning Services found that 63% of teachers and 57% of parents say that homework levels are about right.
homework tips
Although the poll did not include the opinions of students, I would suspect that 95% of them would say that homework levels are NOT about right.

Hopefully, the homework tips on this page will help you, your students, and their parents to be proactive and effective. I know that what I'm offering here is by no means a total solution, but I think it's a pretty good start.

If you get a minute, which is a challenge for all of us, let me know your thoughts on this. It would be great to hear from you.

New! Comments

Have your say about what you just read! Leave me a comment in the box below.


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Top 5: Homework Tips for Parents, Teachers, and Students

“Homework is the first ‘job’ for students with clear consequences if not completed,” says Mason educational psychology professor Anastasia Kitsantas. “It is a vehicle for students to assume responsibility and to learn that they are accountable for their own actions.” Recent research studies reveal that homework experiences increase students’ responsibility for learning and help them build study habits. In Kitsantas’s research, she has found that homework has a positive impact on students’ confidence, development of study strategies, and academic independence. It also influences student achievement indirectly via improved responsibility. Here she shares five tips to make homework a successful experience for everyone involved: parents, teachers, and, especially, students.

Mason education professor Anastasia Kitsantas works with education students on their research posters. Photo by Evan Cantwell.

1. Shift responsibility for homework completion to students.

Help students set goals, engage in time management, monitor their learning environment and effectiveness of strategies, and evaluate performance based on goals. That is, plan out how much time homework completion should take before starting an assignment, make a calendar, and develop a checklist for long-term assignments by dividing the assignment into smaller pieces. Encourage students to self-reflect and discuss outcomes in terms of strategies. If it takes a student a long time to complete a nightly assignment, check to see whether he or she is being distracted. Common distractions can range from viewing video clips to instant messaging.

2. Instill confidence in students to handle homework assignments.

Create mastery experiences with portions of assignments that students believe they can successfully complete. Show a positive attitude for homework completion. If students express dissatisfaction or frustration, allow for a small break and provide support and verbal encouragement for them to continue.

3. Prescribe the right amount of time to spend on homework.

Mason education professor Anastasia Kitsantas has found in her research that more homework doesn’t always translate into greater achievement.

Take into consideration the students’ age, grade level, student capability, and the subject matter when assigning homework. Create shorter and easy-to-complete assignments for elementary students. Children in grades K to 2 should not spend more than10 to 20 minutes each day doing homework. Children in grades 3 to 6, should spend 30 to 60 minutes a day, whereas in junior high and high school, the amount of homework should be about 30 minutes per subject. Research shows thatgenerally increasing the amount of time spent on homework does not lead to higher achievement scores.In fact in one of our studies, increased proportions of homework time spent on mathematics homework were associated with a decrease in math achievement.

4. Provide adequate homework resources.

Create a quiet environment for your child to study. In addition, make sure that items, such as a computer, dictionaries, necessary books, a calculator, drawing instruments, and so forth, are available for use. Research findings show that achievement gaps diminish with the increase in availability of homework resources.

5. View homework as a partnership in learning between the teacher and the home.

Form a teacher-parent team and actively communicate with each other. Parents should follow the directions given by the teacher and avoid confusing their children by using instructional techniques different from the teacher’s.

A correct formula for homework enhances students’ development as independent learners with better study skills, more positive academic attitudes, and greater responsibility toward learning.

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