1997 Song Names In An Essay - Homework for you

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1997 Song Names In An Essay

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Реферат: The Mp3 Essay Research Paper rfghBEFORE 1997

The Mp3 Essay, Research Paper

rfghBEFORE 1997, MP3 WAS A LITTLE known technology that computer geeks used to download compressed music files free off the Internet. But Internet time moves fast-so fast that by 1998 large pockets of the general public and the mainstream media were talking about MP3, not to mention taking advantage of it.

At first the music moguls were afraid of MP3. Protecting copyrights was hard enough without easily accessible Web files enabling any old joes to access-and copy-their favorite music. But when the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) started filing lawsuits against the Web sites and technology companies responsible for providing that capability, it was clear the industry had started to take MP3 seriously. Music on the Web was going to be big.

Today on the Internet, only the word sex generates more searches than the term MP3 does. Musically inclined Web surfers can purchase their favorite CDs and listen to the radio on-line, download their favorite songs, and even custom design CDs. And wouldn’t you know it, start ups have begun springing up in a variety of niches to capitalize on the digital-music revolution.

Hey, kids-what’s that song?

DURING THAT RARE BLOCK OF COMMERcial- and chat free music on your favorite radio station, you hear that song. You know, that song, the one you hum all day during work. The one you just have to own. If only the DJ would stop the music long enough to tell you the name of that song. But alas, the music continues without interruption, and you’re left with a void in your CD library, and the record company with a void in its sales.

That happened to Robert Goldman just often enough for him to identify a gap in the retail music market. Goldman, who has a degree in psychology studied impulse buying–specifically, what drives consumers to purchase CDs. His findings suggest that the radio generates 95% of the impulse for buying music. “You listen to the radio, and if you like what you hear, you’re going to buy it,” ‘ Goldman says. That is, of course, if you know what you’re listening to. And that’s where GetMedia Inc. Goldman’s start up, based in San Jose, Calif. comes in.

Noting the emergence of Internet music sites and the popularity of E-commerce, Goldman saw the Web as the perfect environment to track radio-station play lists in. In 1997 he gathered a development team to create technology that would help radio listeners follow what their favorite stations were playing in real time. Further, he embedded a commerce option in it so listeners could purchase music directly from their trusted radio sta lions, bringing the point of purchase directly to the point of impulse.

GetMedia launched its Web service in May 1999 and went live on a handful of stations, including Mix 93.3, the CBS/Infinity Broadcasting station in Kansas City, Mo. which started using the service in November. Now when Mix 93.3 FM broadcasts, say “Learn to Fly” a popular single from the band Foo Fighters, listeners can tune their Internet browsers to www.Mix93.com, click on the “Now Play ing” link, and find a list of recently played songs, with their album titles and the time Mix 93.3 played them. Play lists also feature “info” icons next to each list ing, where, for instance, Foo Fighters fans can get in-depth information about the band’s latest album, There Is Nothing Left to Lose. Site visitors can even sample songs from the CD.

Of course, the real key to this application is the “Buy” icon. After just a few clicks and a credit-card number, GetMedia will ship There Is Nothing Left to Lose to a Mix 93.3 listener, and the station will pick up some extra cash. “This lets the radio station make money on music they already play for free,” Goldman says. GetMedia takes a percentage of each sale-a revenue model similar to that of major credit-card companies. And unlike on-line music retailers, GetMedia taps into established radio-station audiences and doesn’t need to spend millions on driving traffic to its own site.

So far, 35 radio stations throughout the country have gone live with the service. Some 2,200 stations are on GetMedia’s waiting list, but Goldman doesn’t have the resources to set them up as fast as he’d like. Last September, GetMedia got some help to the tune of $10 million in venture capital from IDG Ven tures, Menlo Ventures, and the Rosewood Stone Group. Goldman plans to use that cash to beef up his 60person staff and outfit those stations awaiting the service.

Record label goes digital

THERE’S A PART OF THE MUSIC INDUSTRY that thrives on rock-and-roll renegades that lead the way to sweeping change. The current indie darling of the Internet music scene is Al Teller, who a l few years ago was anything but independent. Since receiving two engineering de- ‘, grew from Columbia and an M.B.A. from Harvard, Teller has had a 30-year career that includes stints as the head of MCA Music Entertainment Group and presi- ‘, dent of CBS Records. In February 1999, Teller took the plunge with his own capital and launched Atomic Pop, a fusion of music, radio, video games, and television that all comes together at www.atomicpop .com in what looks to be a model for the record label of the future.

Teller’s label offers artists a better deal than they can get from the major record labels. Artists can use the site for promotion and distribution, and to supplement traditional retail channels with on-line sales. “The basic deal is a 50-50 split of the profits,” Teller says. “Majors’ star royalty is roughly 20% of retail price. Per unit, with us, artists can make twice what they’re making at the major labels.” By cutting the multilayered fat of giant marketing and promotions divisions, the 30employee Atomic Pop hopes it can enjoy heftier margins than the majors do.

This new way of doing business was music to the ears of rap giants Public Enemy, the first group that signed with Atomic Pop. Last May, Atomic Pop promoted Public Enemy’s new album, There’s a Poison Goin’ On, and sold it on the site for $10 before it was available in stores. Teller also sold digital downloads of the record for $8, a price that would be tough for majors and retailers to ; match. The real buzz for the album came with the prerelease single, which some 300,000 fans downloaded-free.

Although Atomic Pop doesn’t have the marketing strength that major labels use to get new singles on the radio and on MTV, Teller notes that fans at his site have actively sought the song out instead of simply hearing it passively. “You have to proactively download a single,” he says. So far, There’s a Poison Goin’ On has sold about 90,000 copies-10,000 of which were sold on the Internet. “And that ratio is going to change,” Teller promises.

Still, those numbers represent about half the sales of Public Enemy’s previous albums. Teller blames the shortfall on a less extensive concert tour surrounding the new release. But he remains optimisfit about future sales. Typically, he says, record sales fall off after promotional efforts cease. “We will continue to market and promote the record for months to come. The traditional labels will walk away from records after a short period of time.”

For its first full year of business Atomic Pop saw revenues of about $2 million. The company has yet to turn a prof it, but Teller anticipates one soon. By signing new groups such as the Gas Giants and creating a robust list of releases, Atomic Pop hopes to be aggressive in 2000. The company has also acquired the digital rights to 4AD-the British indie superlabel that boasts such 1980s punk stars as the Pixies and Bauhaus. Add that to its $10-million capital infusion from New Valley Corp. and a recent partnership with Microsoft, and Atomic Pop isn’t looking so indie anymore.

The MP3 piracy police

THE RIAA IS GETTING SERIOUS ABOUT piracy: It recently filed numerous lawsuits against music-related upstarts, claiming they’ve created a black market for illegal copies of digital music.

But not everyone on-line is on the RIAA’s bad side. A handful of savvy startups have joined the antipiracy brigade by offering secure on-line distribution and easy-to-use licensing as a legal alternative to the MP3 free-for-all.

Reciprocal Inc. headquartered in Buf falo, N.Y, operates on a simple principle: all music, whether it’s on CD, the Internet, or the Paleolithic eight track tape, comes with an implicit license agreement. “You can’t legally make 1,000 CD copies and sell them on the street,” says Reciprocal senior vice-president Howard Singer. But on-line, it’s a different story. Music is far too easy to copy and distribute illegally, and sometimes consumers are entirely unaware of their own illegal activity. “You can buy a song from Emusic.com, put it on your computer, post it on a Web page, and send it to your friends,” says Singer. “There’s no technology in place to put any speed bumps in the way of doing that. And the major record labels don’t find that satisfactory.”

Think of Reciprocal as a speed bump. It enables record labels to attach conditions to downloading and distributing protected intellectual property. Reciprocal handles the creation, storage, and issuing of licenses for digital property such as songs and research reports. Reciprocal then reports back to the content owners (record companies or publishing houses) on those transactions. The content owners in turn pay the recording artists any royalties due.

Reciprocal started out as part of Soft bank Corp. a Japanese holding company with interest in more than 120 Internet companies. It spun out in 1997 and has diversified its offerings to include services for the text- and software-publishing communities. But with the prolif eration of digital music distribution, the market for such a service in music alone is huge.

The concept has been a hit with the investment community. Last November, Reciprocal completed a $35-million round of mezzanine financing that included technology- and music-industry heavyweights like Hewlett-Packard, Xerox, and TVT Records. Microsoft had even made its own investment of $15 million in March 1999.

Singer believes that although music currently represents the lion’s share of Reciprocal’s transaction-based revenues, its text-publishing division may ultimately become the company’s biggest moneymaker. And that’s just a simple matter of price point. Textbooks and research reports can cost buyers anywhere from $80 to $4,000. Even if consumers make a practice of downloading entire albums, Singer reminds us, “you’re still looking at a $10 to $15 item.”

What the heck is MP3? Unless you’re a techie or a teen, you may not be familiar with MP3, the hat new method of music distribution. With MP3 the artist records his or her music in digital form and uploads the file for that music onto the Web. Consumers can then download files for their favorite tunes onto their computers and enjoy the music through their home sound systems. They can even store the files on special MP3 listening devices for their mobile listening pleasure.

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission.

Other articles

The Mp3 Essay Research Paper rfghBEFORE 1997

The Mp3 Essay Research Paper rfghBEFORE 1997

The Mp3 Essay, Research Paper

rfghBEFORE 1997, MP3 WAS A LITTLE known technology that computer geeks used to download compressed music files free off the Internet. But Internet time moves fast-so fast that by 1998 large pockets of the general public and the mainstream media were talking about MP3, not to mention taking advantage of it.

At first the music moguls were afraid of MP3. Protecting copyrights was hard enough without easily accessible Web files enabling any old joes to access-and copy-their favorite music. But when the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) started filing lawsuits against the Web sites and technology companies responsible for providing that capability, it was clear the industry had started to take MP3 seriously. Music on the Web was going to be big.

Today on the Internet, only the word sex generates more searches than the term MP3 does. Musically inclined Web surfers can purchase their favorite CDs and listen to the radio on-line, download their favorite songs, and even custom design CDs. And wouldn’t you know it, start ups have begun springing up in a variety of niches to capitalize on the digital-music revolution.

Hey, kids-what’s that song?

DURING THAT RARE BLOCK OF COMMERcial- and chat free music on your favorite radio station, you hear that song. You know, that song, the one you hum all day during work. The one you just have to own. If only the DJ would stop the music long enough to tell you the name of that song. But alas, the music continues without interruption, and you’re left with a void in your CD library, and the record company with a void in its sales.

That happened to Robert Goldman just often enough for him to identify a gap in the retail music market. Goldman, who has a degree in psychology studied impulse buying–specifically, what drives consumers to purchase CDs. His findings suggest that the radio generates 95% of the impulse for buying music. “You listen to the radio, and if you like what you hear, you’re going to buy it,” ‘ Goldman says. That is, of course, if you know what you’re listening to. And that’s where GetMedia Inc. Goldman’s start up, based in San Jose, Calif. comes in.

Noting the emergence of Internet music sites and the popularity of E-commerce, Goldman saw the Web as the perfect environment to track radio-station play lists in. In 1997 he gathered a development team to create technology that would help radio listeners follow what their favorite stations were playing in real time. Further, he embedded a commerce option in it so listeners could purchase music directly from their trusted radio sta lions, bringing the point of purchase directly to the point of impulse.

GetMedia launched its Web service in May 1999 and went live on a handful of stations, including Mix 93.3, the CBS/Infinity Broadcasting station in Kansas City, Mo. which started using the service in November. Now when Mix 93.3 FM broadcasts, say “Learn to Fly” a popular single from the band Foo Fighters, listeners can tune their Internet browsers to www.Mix93.com, click on the “Now Play ing” link, and find a list of recently played songs, with their album titles and the time Mix 93.3 played them. Play lists also feature “info” icons next to each list ing, where, for instance, Foo Fighters fans can get in-depth information about the band’s latest album, There Is Nothing Left to Lose. Site visitors can even sample songs from the CD.

Of course, the real key to this application is the “Buy” icon. After just a few clicks and a credit-card number, GetMedia will ship There Is Nothing Left to Lose to a Mix 93.3 listener, and the station will pick up some extra cash. “This lets the radio station make money on music they already play for free,” Goldman says. GetMedia takes a percentage of each sale-a revenue model similar to that of major credit-card companies. And unlike on-line music retailers, GetMedia taps into established radio-station audiences and doesn’t need to spend millions on driving traffic to its own site.

So far, 35 radio stations throughout the country have gone live with the service. Some 2,200 stations are on GetMedia’s waiting list, but Goldman doesn’t have the resources to set them up as fast as he’d like. Last September, GetMedia got some help to the tune of $10 million in venture capital from IDG Ven tures, Menlo Ventures, and the Rosewood Stone Group. Goldman plans to use that cash to beef up his 60person staff and outfit those stations awaiting the service.

Record label goes digital

THERE’S A PART OF THE MUSIC INDUSTRY that thrives on rock-and-roll renegades that lead the way to sweeping change. The current indie darling of the Internet music scene is Al Teller, who a l few years ago was anything but independent. Since receiving two engineering de- ‘, grew from Columbia and an M.B.A. from Harvard, Teller has had a 30-year career that includes stints as the head of MCA Music Entertainment Group and presi- ‘, dent of CBS Records. In February 1999, Teller took the plunge with his own capital and launched Atomic Pop, a fusion of music, radio, video games, and television that all comes together at www.atomicpop .com in what looks to be a model for the record label of the future.

Teller’s label offers artists a better deal than they can get from the major record labels. Artists can use the site for promotion and distribution, and to supplement traditional retail channels with on-line sales. “The basic deal is a 50-50 split of the profits,” Teller says. “Majors’ star royalty is roughly 20% of retail price. Per unit, with us, artists can make twice what they’

re making at the major labels.” By cutting the multilayered fat of giant marketing and promotions divisions, the 30employee Atomic Pop hopes it can enjoy heftier margins than the majors do.

This new way of doing business was music to the ears of rap giants Public Enemy, the first group that signed with Atomic Pop. Last May, Atomic Pop promoted Public Enemy’s new album, There’s a Poison Goin’ On, and sold it on the site for $10 before it was available in stores. Teller also sold digital downloads of the record for $8, a price that would be tough for majors and retailers to ; match. The real buzz for the album came with the prerelease single, which some 300,000 fans downloaded-free.

Although Atomic Pop doesn’t have the marketing strength that major labels use to get new singles on the radio and on MTV, Teller notes that fans at his site have actively sought the song out instead of simply hearing it passively. “You have to proactively download a single,” he says. So far, There’s a Poison Goin’ On has sold about 90,000 copies-10,000 of which were sold on the Internet. “And that ratio is going to change,” Teller promises.

Still, those numbers represent about half the sales of Public Enemy’s previous albums. Teller blames the shortfall on a less extensive concert tour surrounding the new release. But he remains optimisfit about future sales. Typically, he says, record sales fall off after promotional efforts cease. “We will continue to market and promote the record for months to come. The traditional labels will walk away from records after a short period of time.”

For its first full year of business Atomic Pop saw revenues of about $2 million. The company has yet to turn a prof it, but Teller anticipates one soon. By signing new groups such as the Gas Giants and creating a robust list of releases, Atomic Pop hopes to be aggressive in 2000. The company has also acquired the digital rights to 4AD-the British indie superlabel that boasts such 1980s punk stars as the Pixies and Bauhaus. Add that to its $10-million capital infusion from New Valley Corp. and a recent partnership with Microsoft, and Atomic Pop isn’t looking so indie anymore.

The MP3 piracy police

THE RIAA IS GETTING SERIOUS ABOUT piracy: It recently filed numerous lawsuits against music-related upstarts, claiming they’ve created a black market for illegal copies of digital music.

But not everyone on-line is on the RIAA’s bad side. A handful of savvy startups have joined the antipiracy brigade by offering secure on-line distribution and easy-to-use licensing as a legal alternative to the MP3 free-for-all.

Reciprocal Inc. headquartered in Buf falo, N.Y, operates on a simple principle: all music, whether it’s on CD, the Internet, or the Paleolithic eight track tape, comes with an implicit license agreement. “You can’t legally make 1,000 CD copies and sell them on the street,” says Reciprocal senior vice-president Howard Singer. But on-line, it’s a different story. Music is far too easy to copy and distribute illegally, and sometimes consumers are entirely unaware of their own illegal activity. “You can buy a song from Emusic.com, put it on your computer, post it on a Web page, and send it to your friends,” says Singer. “There’s no technology in place to put any speed bumps in the way of doing that. And the major record labels don’t find that satisfactory.”

Think of Reciprocal as a speed bump. It enables record labels to attach conditions to downloading and distributing protected intellectual property. Reciprocal handles the creation, storage, and issuing of licenses for digital property such as songs and research reports. Reciprocal then reports back to the content owners (record companies or publishing houses) on those transactions. The content owners in turn pay the recording artists any royalties due.

Reciprocal started out as part of Soft bank Corp. a Japanese holding company with interest in more than 120 Internet companies. It spun out in 1997 and has diversified its offerings to include services for the text- and software-publishing communities. But with the prolif eration of digital music distribution, the market for such a service in music alone is huge.

The concept has been a hit with the investment community. Last November, Reciprocal completed a $35-million round of mezzanine financing that included technology- and music-industry heavyweights like Hewlett-Packard, Xerox, and TVT Records. Microsoft had even made its own investment of $15 million in March 1999.

Singer believes that although music currently represents the lion’s share of Reciprocal’s transaction-based revenues, its text-publishing division may ultimately become the company’s biggest moneymaker. And that’s just a simple matter of price point. Textbooks and research reports can cost buyers anywhere from $80 to $4,000. Even if consumers make a practice of downloading entire albums, Singer reminds us, “you’re still looking at a $10 to $15 item.”

What the heck is MP3? Unless you’re a techie or a teen, you may not be familiar with MP3, the hat new method of music distribution. With MP3 the artist records his or her music in digital form and uploads the file for that music onto the Web. Consumers can then download files for their favorite tunes onto their computers and enjoy the music through their home sound systems. They can even store the files on special MP3 listening devices for their mobile listening pleasure.

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission.

How to Incorporate Lyrics Into an Essay

How to Incorporate Lyrics Into an Essay

Lyrics can be effective tools in an essay. You may want to cite lyrics, because a song writer says something in an eloquent way, or the excerpt solidifies a point you’re trying to make. You are allowed to quote a portion of a song under the fair use doctrine of the United States copyright law, but the law doesn’t specify exactly how many words or what percentage of a song you can use. You can use a limited portion of a song for your research paper, but it must be acknowledged though in-text citations and a listing in your works cited or reference page.

Quotations and In-Text Citations

When incorporating lyrics into an essay, put the lyrics inside quotation marks. Short quotations can be integrated into a sentence, such as, “In the song ‘Hey Jude,’ the Beatles sing…” followed by the lyrics in quotation marks. Long quotations, or those that are four lines or longer, need to be set off in a block quote, where you indent the entire quote from the paragraph above it. To cite the lyrics in Modern Language Association format, write the artists’ name in parentheses, such as (The Beatles), followed by the ending punctuation. To cite in American Psychological Association format, include the artist, copyright date and track number in parentheses, such as (The Beatles, 1968, track 1). Note the comma between the artist and year and between the year and track number.

Reference List

Include the details of the recording in your works cited or references page. In MLA format, include the artist’s name, song title, album name, name of the recording manufacturer, publication date and the sound recording medium, for example:

The Beatles. “Hey Jude.” Hey Jude: The U. S. Album (italicized). Capitol, 2014. CD.

Citing this recording in APA style is slightly different, so follow the example:

The Beatles. (2014). Hey Jude. On Hey Jude: The U. S. Album (italicize the album name) [CD]. Los Angeles: Capitol (Recorded 1968).

References

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A Simple Song Essays

A Simple Song

Island of the blue Dolphins
Have you ever felt as if you were an outcast? I mean totally different from everyone else. Well if you have I should tell you you're not alone. In this book report I will tell you about two outcasts that unite as one and make an amazing individual.

cirque du freak
I was in my freshman year of college, home for the summer and my best friend Shakira went on a date with this guy and know one could reach them. Well of course her mother and father called me looking for her, because she told them she would be with me.

jay
What's up this be that ni**a from Detroit holdin it down fo the class of 03 as u can see my name is I lick it a lot and that's fo one reason cause I luv the taste of a wet pu$$y and IM looking for the special girl to give it to all the time at the moment IM not single but I still can have friends so if u like what u hear holla back ill have a pic on here soon but in the meantime ill give a description Black Hair, Braided sometimes 5'8", 5'9" Light Skin Nice smile A tornado tongue What IM looking fo in a girl: Gotta have a nice personality Keeps herself clean Can kiss Knows how to keep her man happy (cause I know how to keep my women happy) Gotta be thic I don't want no under 110 girls or no girl that's extremely huge Gotta have something that's wet most of the time so I can lick it If u think u fit this description or u like me description holla back at an ni66a fo sho ( by the way ladies take this test ) THE FREAK TEST; HAVE YOU EVER. 1.

An Essay on my impressions of the POLYSICS Concert in Chicago, IL

An Essay on my impressions of the POLYSICS Concert in Chicago, IL Rocking out in Chicago!

I was expecting a great show. What I got was an F@#$ing awesome show! I went to the POLYSICS show at The Abbey Pub in my hometown of Chicago and I was blown away! I stumbled on the band POLYSICS one day out of boredom. I could remember that day. I was surfing You Tube and remembered this Japanese band, POLYSICS. I thought “What the heck might as well check them out”. I watched the video for their song “Pretty Good” since they offered a plethora of videos to watch. Really good was more like it. I was instantly zapped by the music! Their video was amazing. I watched all of their music videos that day, I was hooked. POLYSICS combine the fanatic frenzy of fast punk rock with the colorful noise of synthesizer music. It’s the best fusion I ever heard. They are considered New Wave because of their original sound. I’d like to say they are a mix of The Ramones (Punk music) and Daft Punk (Electronic music) which happen to be my two favorite all time bands! Now I got one more to add to my list and that’s POLYSICS! I will give my full impressions on the concert and hopefully make you see how awesome they are too!

Before the review, here is a little back info on the band. The band is heavily influenced by the American band DEVO (which are big fans of POLYSICS too). The band was formed in Tokyo, Japan. Hiroyuki Hayashi created the band after watching some live concert footage of Devo in 1997. The name POLYSICS actually is derived from the very first synthesizer Hiro actually owned, called the Korg Polysix. The band has seen many members in the 11 years they have been together. Today, it consists mostly of Hiro on lead guitar and vocals, Fumi on bass, Yano on drums, and Kayo on synthesizer. They have released many albums in their native land Japan and have released some albums stateside. Their signature “Technicolor Pogo Punk”, as they put it, music creates a vivid sound and dynamic performance. Their lyrics are sung in either English, Japanese or just plain gibberish (they call it Moon Language). Or sometimes even all at once! They wear signature orange boiler suits with the unmistakable “P” on the front of their suit. Also unique to them is the straight bar sunglasses that give them a futuristic look. They have done cover songs of Devo, The Ramones, B-52’s, Talking Heads, and Nirvana just to name a few! They work with MySpace Records to release albums here and even having the founder, Tom Anderson, as a huge fan!

I arrived at Abbey Pub at around seven thirty on a freezing Chicago night. I waited with my girlfriend Brenda to be let into the pub. As I stood chattering my teeth from the cold, I happen to have a chance sighting. It was the bassist Fumi going outside for a smoke. I have to tell the truth, I was awestruck by her. Brenda didn’t believe me that she was with the band. She finished and I watched her go back in. I’m going to admit this right now; I am a big POLYSICS fan. The videos they done are extremely ingenious and entertaining. They also have the music to back it up. My favorite songs are numerous, as are the genres they use in their music. They genres of music they use are punk, Electronic, Rock, Synth Pop, J (Japanese) Rock, and Noise Rock to name a couple off the top of my head. I think it would have been easier to list them under New Wave because it could encompass all those genres into one. I just like how their songs sound. It goes from the very fast and punk-y “New Wave Jacket” to the melodic and slow “Black Out Fall Out” and everything in between. I can name probably 50+ songs that I love to listen too. I can only name a couple of bands that I listen to on a regular basis or like a massive amount of their songs. I like how they use voice changers to sound robotic in their songs like the song “Hard Rock Thunder”. I love how Kayo, the synthesizer player, sings in her normal soft voice in one song and than change it up too a rough electronic voice in another song. I love the energy Hiro injects to his lyrics (whether they are in English, Japanese, or Moon Language; doesn’t matter) and into his stage antics and music videos. Each music video is unique on its own and has its own memorable scenes. There are so many reasons why I think they are so good, too many too list.

Enough with my little rant, time to get back to my story. I finally got in after waiting about an hour in the blistering cold. I was warming myself up when I happen to see Hiro selling POLYSICS merchandise. I was awe struck again…I couldn’t help it. I mustered up the courage to go near him and the table with the merchandise. They had shirts, pins, sweat bands, CDS, LPs, stickers, and posters. My eye quickly went to the t shirts and how cool they looked. I bought one for me and Brenda and later also one of their CDs, which was “Now is the Time!” I would have bought more but was a little low on cash. I told him that “I love your music” and shook his hand too. I felt like a nerd but oh well. After that little icebreaker, I asked him for a photograph. He was very compliant with me and other fans request of taking picture of or signing autographs, which I thought was really great. I took one with him and took one with Brenda and him in the picture. I once again thanked him and shook his hand. He thanked me each time, very nice man. After deciding to stop bugging him, by Brenda’s request, we made our way to the front of the stage.

There were two bands in front on POLYSICS. Two bands too many was what I thought at first. I was in for a pleasant surprise…more or less. The first band was from Brooklyn at they went by the moniker Black Gold. I could describe their sound as being that of Cold Play. If you ask my girlfriend, she would agree. Their music, as Cold Play does, would melt the pants off any girl. The second band was named Jaguar Love if I’m not mistaken. The first impression they gave me was Led Zeppelin. I’m going to have to be honest; I did not hear a single word the front man was singing. Someone yelled out “You suck” during one of their songs. I don’t want to agree with the gentleman choice words but he got a tongue lashing from the lead singer. Ill just say they weren’t my cup of tea. I enjoyed both bands in different levels but I could clearly remember saying to myself “Hold on! They should be finished after this song. Than its POLYSICS time!” It was over and I could hardly stop smiling.

The crowds during the first two bands were sparse. When the last band played and finished their last song, the people started to bunch up together. It got really compact that I was pushed almost all the way to the stage. I should thank them because it was a perfect spot to take some pictures and video of the event. The down size was that I could barely move. There was music playing each time a band was setting up. The song selection for when POLYSICS was setting was New Wave of course. One memory firmly placed in my head was when “Take on me” by a-ha played over the speakers. Hiro and Fumi sung some of the lyrics while they were backed up by the crowd doing a great job when the hook came, hitting the high notes of that song perfectly. It was great listening to them hit the notes right on the head. I never thought a band setting up and doing sound checks would be so fun. Hiro wasn’t in POLYSICS garb yet and was wearing a simple but cool Devo shirt; simple as just having the word Devo on his shirt. I was wearing a huge coat and was overheating from the crowd’s heat. So I asked the guy in front of me if he could do me the favor of putting my coat underneath a nook in the stage. He instantly recognized me from another event that I attended a couple of months ago. His name is Ryan. It was a nice encounter and I thanked him for granting my favor and for something else. He shared some pictures of the event we went to and I was glad to thank him in person, small world I guess. The band finished setting up and left the stage. A couple of minutes later, it all began.

It all started with a roadie, I’m guessing, coming out and announcing the band. He gets the crowd riled up and he turns on a silver iPod that was connected to the electric piano. Music blasts out as the crowd cheers for the start of the show. Hiro comes out, shaking his body in excitement to mimic the crowd’s joyous reaction of him coming out. The rest of the band, Fumi, Yano, and Kayo, comes out and gets situated to rock out. He got the crowd cheering with his onstage antics. It is kind of hard to explain what he does during live performances that make him so memorable. But ill try my best to try to explain his and the other band members little idiosyncrasies that give POLYSICS their oh so delicious flavor. One thing ill mention is his upbeat tone of voice. Hiro has the great habit of doing this with the most mundane thing. For example, when he walks out to put on his guitar and start the show. Normal front men usually walk and put on their gear. Hiro will actually have a skip in his step. He does this throughout the show and its just fun too see. The energy is much appreciated and fits the music that they play which is upbeat and rocking. It also makes for great pictures as I found out for myself. Another good example is how Kayo presents herself too. She, as I mentioned before, is the synthesizer player. Synthesizers give computer generated notes that sound almost robotic. She plays the part when she sings some lyrics and the synthesizer changes her voice to that of a robot. Not only does her voice play the part but so does her body. In videos and concert footage, she rarely deviates from her stiff posture and calculated movements. It gives her the quintessence of being an android, which is cool in my book. This gimmick mixed with Hiro’s high energy antics and guitar playing makes for an exceptional feast for the eyes.

The beginning notes too “Buggie Technica” blares out of the speakers. As the song name implies, it sounds like techno music but with guitars, really good song. I snapped some pictures. The interesting part of live concerts is you never know what’s going to happen. I forget that my experience with POLYSICS music is different from others. My expression for the music is that I will sing lyrics (lyrics I can decipher anyway) and that would be my maximum level of showing my excitement. That and maybe hoping around too the beat, I'm a very reserved person unfortunately. It never dawned on me other peoples reaction to their music but it was made painfully obvious that evening. The song, like most of their songs, was fast and hard. The crowd reacted with a pushing match from behind where I was standing. At certain points of the song, the crowd would push its way towards the stage and than recede to their original state, like the ebb tide of an ocean on a full moon. I thought it was an interesting reaction to the song. What I found kind of funny was that, from my vantage point, it seemed like it was being caused by one person. She seemed like she was the one doing all the wave action to the dismay of my girlfriend next too me that got the brunt of the force. Don’t quote me on this but I might be wrong. This is just what I noticed.

The band shot out songs like bullets from a barrel. They played so many of their songs. This is the list from the top of my head in no particular order: Buggie Technica, Moog is Love, Pretty Good, I My Me Mine, We ate the Machine, Kaja Kaja Goo, My Sharona, Rocket, Tei Tei Tei. Baby Bias, DNA Junction, Coelakanth is Android, and Peach Pie on the Beach. There might have been an extra one or two but I can’t put my finger on it. You’re probably thinking how weird the names are but each song is great to listen to concert. Don’t believe me? Buy their CD, I dare you. If not, take my word on it. If you liked my description of them in earlier paragraph than you’ll like them. They played each song in rapid succession with one or two water breaks. The energy never dissipated from either the band or the crowd, I enjoyed every minute of it!

During the concert, it took a fair amount of pictures and some video of certain songs. The video turned out pretty bad because of my location near the speakers which made the sound on the play back distorted. My camera angles were shaky because of the happy crowd jumping up and down, knocking me around in the process. I didn’t mind though, it was all in good fun. The pictures, on the other hand, turned out fantastic. Far more better than I could ever hope for or imagine. I specifically bought a new 7 mega pixel camera so I can take vibrant shots of them while they played onstage. I bought a new 1 giga byte memory card and battery for a full charge. It was a pretty expensive combo but I was super happy on how the pictures came out. Hiro has the wonderful habit of twisting his face and body to the high energy music. This of course makes for some interesting and dynamic shots. I captured, for the most part, the essence of POLYSICS in picture form in all its still glory. I documented about 80 percent of the concert in either picture or video form. I would have gotten more but my camera battery died out from the extensive use. Next time ill just have to buy an extra spare battery and perhaps more memory to capture more.

The crowd involvement was just as entertaining as the band was. I even saw a mini mosh pit to the left of me. I joined the mass of people by singing the lyrics to their songs. On certain songs, I was impressed by mine and their near perfect mimic of their Japanese lyrics. We probably didn’t know what they meant but it was still great to listen too or sing back. Never hurts to try to find out the meaning to the lyrics either. Sometimes I would hear the crowd drown out the voices of the band, which was pretty cool in my book. Even times when Hiro would motion us to sing some of the song we would hit it right on the head. That, to me, was another impressive thing that happen. I also noticed during the chorus of “I my me mine” that the whole room erupted. Everyone collectively hoped around during that part of the song, as I did. When in Rome, do as the Roman’s do. Sometimes the crowd would get a little too physical. I noticed at some points during the concert that the very front row would get smashed on the stage border. Other times it would be an elbow to the back or slap of the hand to the rear. That type of intimacy is better left to someone you know or love but what can you do at is my logic. People will get excited and get out of control; it’s a fact of life.

The best part of the concert was of course POLYSICS. Their stage presence is overwhelming, to me anyway. Fumi, the bassist, is just as energetic as Hiro but a little more lax. She has a fast fingers to keep up with the songs fast pace, which I find mind blowing. Such a petite and innocent girl can make such a booming and great sound. During the song “We ate the Machine”, this fact I’ve just stated was proven with great impact. The song is kind of on the heavy metal side. She sang the song with a thunderous roar. She even head banged her way at a certain point of the song; making a hurricane with her hair. Awesome! Kayo, on synthesizer, adds to the bands image. As mentioned before, she don’s the persona of an android. She will have little to no movement during a song. The only real movement during any song is her mouth. If you stumbled into a POLYSICS concert, you’d be surprised by her voice; most of the time, a synthetic and loud robotic voice booms out when she sings. This can take someone by surprise. She deviates every now and than to punch up the performance. During the chorus of “Peach Pie on the Beach”, for instance, she broke out a pair of golden pom poms for the song. She even had a dance the consisted of hoping on one leg with the other one swirling behind her in midair. Very cute! Yano, the drummer, is on the reserve side like Kayo. In interviews while playing, he is a very quite man. He just lets his drum playing speak for it self. His drumming is so fast it’s amazing. I will always associate his playing style with the style of The Ramones drummers. The speed and consistency is right with how they played. This is a compliment because I love The Ramones too. The amount of stamina you have to have to play at that speed is truly awe aspiring.

Too describe Hiro’s zany demeanor, he needs his own paragraph. Hiro first impressed me with his guitar skills in songs and videos. He mastered my affection when I saw him in concert. This guy's skills are out of this world. During one song, he played a couple of notes with his teeth! He even tried playing the guitar with the microphone stand, I mean wow! He took his guitar and strung some tunes using the micstand stand as he would his fingers. I think it was a gag but he played some notes on it which was so cool. He played while he was on his knees and walked around for a bit too. Another cool thing he did was he went to the edge of the crowd and played super close and, I think, let people touch him and his ax. On the song “Baby Bias”, he would do jumping jacks as Kayo sang. On the song “Tei Tei Tei!” he got the crowd involved by grunting out a chorus as he lifted and pumped his guitar in the air, leading the charge himself. I joined in and I almost choked from hoarseness after I grunted the hardest I could. He plays and breaks character by doing something out of the ordinary which is funny and great at the same time. For example, he’ll be throwing kicks in the air or head banging to a song and than he’ll stop playing and wave to the crowd or something playful in that nature. It’s so cool that he can mix it up like that and it’s a nice treat when the concert is happening. I love when he shakes his head back and forth. His long hair swaying back and forth makes for great pictures. Me and Brenda, like others, got sprayed his sweat which is always cool at a rocking concert. The last thing ill mention because I could go on and on is what happen when the last song played. He played the last song with his butt too the crowd. He did this to the far left of me and I watched as the crowd patted him on the butt as he played. I though this was wild and I felt the right side was a little left out. Luckily for me, he came over to us and started to moon us too. I couldn’t resist. I made my way towards the stage as other people patted him on the butt and laid a playful smack on his rear. He rolled on the ground a little making a face from the beating his bum took, it was freaking great! So let’s recap. I shook his hand, got his sweat on me, and smacked his butt! I couldn’t ask for a better time with one of my favorite idol and band.

They finished playing a dragged out finish to their last song. They thanked us for coming and all that good stuff. Finally they left the stage. I put away my camera so I could have my hands ready. I knew what was coming next. The room explodes with cheers, applause, and whistles as they left the stage. The crowd is still pumped after the 13 plus songs. I joined in on the celebration when I heard the first person start the chant. POL-Y-SICS, POL-Y-SICS, POL-Y-SICS. That went on for a very short time before they came back on. They seemed happy that we wanted an encore. I bet they must have been really exhausted by this time. Hiro’s boiler suit was completely drenched in sweat by this time. Halfway through the concert he had to remove his glasses because the beads of sweat. He yelled out the next song they were going to play, “New Wave Jacket.” I flipped out. I think this is one of their fastest and awesome sounding songs they ever made. Apparently everyone else agreed with the next song choice because they blew up too. Hiro’s excitement still hadn’t died by that time. He was so into it that when the first part of the song started, he started humping his guitar. I kid you not! After that great song finished he quickly announced the next one, “Electric Surfin’ Go Go”. This song is one of my favorites as is the music video, which is like capturing an acid trip on film. It sounded better live when the sound is firing at you full force. We rocked out until they finished the last note. This time it was finally over.

I wanted to wait a little for maybe an autograph or another picture with them. We couldn’t because they needed everyone to leave because it was closing time. It was around 1 o clock in the morning so it was ok. I heard later from Ryan that he held out a little and actually saw them start to pack up. He got an autograph which was pretty good. I will definitely get their autograph next time. I see myself going to every show they have here in Chicago for as many times they can do it. I was really impressed on how they sounded in real life and by how unique their sound is overall. That night was such a great night for me. I hope I was able to capture how cool they are but I think I did them some justice. To see them and to try to write about them is completely different things. I urge people reading this to give them a shot because you’ll hear something different and good. That’s my opinion anyway. I hope they come back to Chicago soon. I was happy to write this and hope you enjoyed, even if it was somewhat. I leave you with this last message and it comes from the heart.